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Tue, Feb 26, 2008
4:00pm
Mary Catherine Bateson: Building Community, Composing a New Life - Special Event (GLC Auditorium)
The Graduate School proudly presents its spring 2008 distinguished speaker, Mary Catherine Bateson, a writer and cultural anthropologist, professor emerita, visiting professor at Harvard, and creator of the Active Wisdom model for community dialogues. She has written and co-authored many books and articles. She lectures across the country and abroad, and is president of the Institute for Intercultural Studies in New York City. The presentation will be followed by a book signing.
Thu, Feb 28, 2008
5:00pm
"Narrative and Violence" Lecture by Professor Charles L. Briggs - Special Event (Pamplin 30)
Charles L. Briggs is the Alan Dundes Distinguished Professor in Folklore at the University of California, Berkeley. He focuses on linguistic and medical anthropology, social theory, modernity, citizenship and the state, race, and violence. He has studied the tension between modernity and traditionality as socio-political processes in performance, focusing on jokes, proverbs, legends, myths, anecdotes, gossip, curing songs, and ritual wailing, along with how constructions on language and tradition have shaped the politics of modernity. He has conducted research with Latino/a populations in the Southwestern US and in Latin America. Current projects focus on revolutionary health care in Venezuela; how the state is "communicated" through the press-particulary through health issues-in Cuba,Venezuela, and the United States; and how violence is projected in legal, media, and medical institutions (Venezuela)
Thu, Mar 13, 2008
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Bob Schieffer, CBS Washington chief correspondent and host of "Face the Nation," will give a talk, "Washington and the World."
Wed, Mar 26, 2008
12:15pm
Carolyn Miller "Questions for Genre Theory from the Blogosphere" - Special Event (370)
Carolyn Miller is Distinguished Professor of Rhetoric and Technical Communication at North Carolina State University and editor of the journal Rhetoric Society Quarterly.
Mon, Apr 7, 2008
5:00pm
Cleaning up sediments without throwing mud - Academic (Squires Haymarket Theatre)
The CH2M Hill Distinguished Lecture, "Cleaning Up Sediments Without Throwing Mud," will be presented by Richard G. Luthy, the Silas H. Palmer Professor and Chair of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. Dredging's ability to achieve sediment cleanup goals depends on improving and intensifying monitoring data and on favorable site conditions. Dr. Luthy and research colleagues are participating in the field evaluation of activated carbon deployment in the Grasse River in New York. They anticipate demonstrating that activated carbon amendment is an effective non-removal management strategy for reducing the bioavailability of PCBs in sediments. Dr. Luthy's lecture is hosted by Virginia Tech's Via Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and made possible by a gift from CH2M Hill, Inc.
Tue, Apr 8, 2008
12:00pm
Virginia Tech Roanoke Center Research Forum - Special Event (Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
"An Afternoon With Nikki Giovanni" presented by Nikki Giovanni, University Distinguished Professor.
Fri, Sep 5, 2008
12:00pm
Virginia Tech Roanoke Center Research Forum - Special Event (Claude Moore Education Complex at the Roanoke Higher Education Center)
"The Bad and the Good of the Civil War Centennial" a lecture by James I. Robertson, Jr, Alumni Distinguished Professor and Executive Director, Virginia Center for Civil War Studies will be hosted by the Virginia Tech Roanoke Center.
Thu, Sep 18, 2008
4:15pm
Wachovia Speaker Series - Special Event (Alumni Assembly Hall)
Pamplin College of Business finance alumnus and investment banker Brian Slingerland will give a talk on Thursday, Sept. 18, as the Wachovia Distinguished Speaker. The lecture will start at 4:15 p.m. at the Holtzman Alumni Centers Alumni Assembly Hall.
Thu, Sep 25, 2008
4:00pm
An enzyme that is key to suppressing grassy weeds, treating parasite diseases of people, and controlling obesity - Seminar/Conference (Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Conference Center)
Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Presentation Dr. Robert Haselkorn is the F. L. Pritzker Distinguished Service Professor of molecular genetics and cell biology at the University of Chicago and a recipient of the university's Quantrell Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching. A member of the National Academy of Sciences as well as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he is past president of the International Society for Plant Molecular Biology. His research interests lie in the areas of cellular differentiation in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, in bacterial genomics, and in the workings of the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase in plants, parasites, and people.
Wed, Oct 8, 2008
6:30pm
Distinguished Faculty Research Forum - Special Event (The Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
Robert Denton, W. Thomas Rice Chair, Virginia Tech Corps and Director of the Center for Leadership Development will present a lecture, "The 2008 Presidential Election"at the Virginia Tech Roanoke Center.
Wed, Oct 22, 2008
12:15pm
Leadership: The Art and Science of Conversation - Seminar/Conference (GLC Multipurpose Room)
The Graduate School is pleased to present its Distinguished Speaker Series, featuring poet and lecturer David Whyte, who uses poetry to help individuals and organizations "expand personal and professional visions and think in fresh and innovative ways." Through poetry and storytelling he opens the "conversational edge" where imagination, creativity and energy converge and allow us to conceive of "new and unexpected answers to old problems." Through his lectures, Whyte contributes to our understanding of individual and organizational change. His clients include Boeing, Frito-Lay, The Mayo Clinic, Stanford, The Royal Air Force of GB, and many more.
Thu, Nov 6, 2008
12:00pm
Distinguished Faculty Research Forum - Special Event (Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
Nicolaus Tideman, Professor of Economics, will present a lecture, "Taxes and the Economy" at the Virginia Tech Roanoke Center.
Fri, Nov 14, 2008
2:00pm
Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat: New Perspectives on Gender and Gaming - Seminar/Conference (Fralin Auditorium)
The Trent Distinguished Lecture Series in conjunction with the Center for Information Technology Impacts on Children, Youth and Families will host Dr. Carrie Heeter, professor of Serious Game Design at Michigan State University. She is also MSU's Creative Director for Virtual University Design and Technology. Her lecture topic stems from her recent publication in the MIT Press. A reception will follow her lecture.
Fri, Nov 21, 2008
8:30am
Enabling Nanomaterials for Advanced Drug Delivery - Seminar/Conference (Skelton Alumni Center, Inn at Virginia Tech)
To introduce the Southwest Virginia medical, materials, and business communities to the potential and current practice of materials medicine, the Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute (MII) and the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS) are sponsoring a program featuring university researchers and distinguished plenary lecturers from Cal Tech and the University of Nebraska Medical Center. The development of systems to deliver medicines to targeted sites within the body, such as within cells, is one of the fastest growing areas of medicine. Virginia Tech's polymer science group is combining the expertise of researchers from chemistry, wood science, biomedical science, and other fields to develop synthetic biomaterials that will precisely interact with membranes and complex with DNA. The research has the potential to make a large impact on human health. And the development of new materials for the delivery of therapeutics is a fertile area for small start up companies and giant pharmaceutical companies alike.
Fri, Jan 23, 2009
10:00am
Virginia Tech hosts symposium to forge agenda for financial regulatory reform - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (NAPA, 900 7th Street NW, Suite 600, Washington, D.C.)
Virginia Tech's Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) has organized a symposium, A Public Administration Moment: Forging an Agenda for Financial Regulatory Reform. The event is sponsored by the Smith-Richardson Foundation which is dedicated to contributing to important public debates that address serious public policy challenges facing the United States. Virginia Tech National Capital Region Operations and the School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) are also supporting the event. The symposium will provide a cutting-edge discussion highlighting the public administration challenges of principle, design, method, and management that should guide financial regulatory reform. A panel of accomplished scholars will address "Lessons from the Financial Crisis" and a response panel of distinguished scholars and National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) Fellows will discuss, "Where Do We Go From Here?" Discussions from the forum will be published in a future issue of Public Administration Review. Panelists include: Ron Boster, National Academy of Public Administration Fellow, Mark Cassell, Kent State University; Kevin Corder and Susan Hoffman, Western Michigan University; Giselle Datz, Virginia Tech, Alexandria; Donald Kettl, University of Pennsylvania and National Academy of Public Administration Fellow; Laurel McFarland, National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration; Paul Peretz, California State University, Fullerton; Marvin Phaup, George Washington University; Jean Schroedel, Claremont Graduate University; Mark Rom, Georgetown University; Myra Shiplett, Randolph Morgan Consulting, LLC, and Tom Stanton, Johns Hopkins University and National Academy of Public Administration Fellow. Anne Khademian, Virginia Tech, Alexandria, will serve as facilitator. To register online go to
Fri, Feb 6, 2009
12:00pm
The First Interracial Marriage - Special Event (Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
The Virginia Tech Roanoke Center welcomes Peter Wallenstein, professor of History, who will present a talk on The First Interracial Marriage: Interracial Families in Virginia, Past and Present. This event is part of our Distinguished Faculty Research Forum series. Reservations may be made by calling or emailing the center.
Tue, Feb 10, 2009
7:00pm
Poetry Reading - Special Event (Volume Two Bookstore)
Nikki Giovanni, University Distinguished Professor of English, will be reading from her new collection of poetry "Bicycles: Love Poems" and signing copies at The Volume Two Bookstore.
Mon, Feb 16, 2009
3:30pm
Wachovia Distinguished Speaker-Terry Blevins - Special Event (Alumni Assembly Hall- The Inn At Virginia Tech)
Terry Blevins, Exec. VP and CFO of Landmark Media Enterprises LLC, will give a talk, "Expect, react, and adapt to a Black Swan - the improbable scenario."
Fri, Mar 6, 2009
12:00pm
Kitchen Design - Special Event (Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
The Virginia Tech Roanoke Center will host Julia Beamish, Professor of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management,at its March Distinguished Faculty Research Forum. Reservations may be made by calling or emailing the Virginia Tech Roanoke Center.
Thu, Mar 26, 2009
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Michael Beschloss, Presidential Courage. In a talk based on his recent book, the award-winning historian and best-selling author will discuss crucial times when presidents took political risks and overcame obstacles to dramatically change the future of the United States. Appointed NBC News' presidential historian, Beschloss provides viewers with expert analysis of the executive branch.
Fri, Apr 3, 2009
12:00pm
Nanotechnology and the Environment - Special Event (Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
The Virginia Tech Roanoke Center will host Michael Hochella, University Distinguished Professor, Geosciences, at its April Distinguished Faculty Research Forum in Roanoke. Reservations may be made by calling or emailing the center.
Fri, Apr 3, 2009
12:00pm
"Nanotechnology and Earth? Their relationship may astound you!" - Special Event (Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
Michael Hochella, University Distinguished Professor, Geosciences will speak at the Virginia Tech Roanoke Center's Distinguished Faculty Research. The event will be held at the Roanoke Higher Education Center, 108 N. Jefferson Street, Roanoke, VA. Most people, even those trained in science, may have no idea what nanotechnology has to do with planet Earth. It turns out that the normal functioning of the Earth, from its inception, has been a massive generator of nanoparticles, far more abundant and chemically diverse than anything mankind will ever create. Do you remember (or did you think about) your last breath? OK, no, but take another one right now. You just breathed in about 50 million of them, some naturally occurring, some as a result of human activity. How about the last glass of water you drank, or the dirt in your garden that you will dig into this spring? You guessed it . . . nanoparticles are everywhere, for many reasons and doing many things, some good, and some not so good. Perhaps surprisingly, we have not known about this for long, and our present knowledge is thin, to say the least. But what we have determined to date, in this only recently uncovered nano-world, is simply fascinating
Tue, Apr 7, 2009
7:00pm
Kingston is featured speaker at Blacksburg Cafe' Scientifique event - Special Event (Awful Arthur's, downtown)
A new event in Blacksburg designed to take scientific research out of the laboratory and deliver it to a more general audience will feature a Virginia Tech professor known internationally for his work in biodiversity and the development of naturally occurring cancer-fighting agents. Cafe' Scientifique of Blacksburg will hold its second event on April 7, 2009, from 7 to 9 p.m. at Awful Arthur's restaurant on the corner of Draper Road and Washington Street. David G.I. Kingston, University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry in Virginia Tech's College of Science, will present "Drug Discovery from Nature: Why, Where and How." Admission to the event is free and open to the general public. The goal of Cafe' Scientifique is to present science in an informal setting that will encourage public discussion. A 10-20 minute presentation from the featured researcher is followed by a question and answer session from the audience.
Tue, Apr 14, 2009
7:00pm
How Women Age: Family, Work, Health and the Challenges We Face - Special Event (Fralin Biotechnology Center Auditorium)
Please join us for the 13th Annual Center for Gerontology Graduate Certificate & Awards Celebration. Dr. Melissa A. Hardy, Director of the Gerontology Center, Distinguished Professor of Human Development and Family Studies and Professor of Sociology at The Pennsylvania State University will be the Keynote speaker.
Fri, Apr 17, 2009
3:00pm
Department of Philosophy Colloquium - Academic (Torgersen 3100)
Speaker: Don Ihde, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Director of the Technoscience Research Group, SUNY Stonybrook.
Tue, Apr 21, 2009
5:30pm
The Steger Prize for Poetry - Special Event (Torgersen Museum)
University Distinguished Professor Nikki Giovanni and President Charles W. Steger will recognize the winners in the competition for the Steger Award for undergraduate poetry. The award, now in its third year and established by the Virginia Tech president, carries a $1,000 prize, with second, third, and honorable mention also honored. Along with the prize winners, faculty members from the English Department will also read their own poetry. Reception to follow.
Fri, Apr 24, 2009
2:00pm
Teaching and researching natural resources in Nepal during a time of political and social unrest - Special Event (International Affairs Office (526 Prices Fork Road)
Shankar Lakhey, Lakshman Shrestha, and Raj Babu Pahadi, distinguished guests from Nepal, will present a lecture on teaching and researching natural resources in Nepal during a time of political and social unrest. This event is co-sponsored by the College of Natural Resources, the Office of International Research, Education, and Development (OIRED), the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention, and the Memorial Center of Excellence at the Institute of Forestry in Pokhara, Nepal
Fri, May 1, 2009
12:00pm
The Pilot Street Project - Special Event (Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
The Virginia Tech Roanoke Center will host Amy Nasta, Coordinator of International Programs, at its May Distinguished Faculty Research Forum in Roanoke. Amy will share the work being done in Roanoke in partnership with Refugee and Immigration Services. Approximately 90% of participants are recent refugees from various countries in Africa and are successfully resettling in their new culture.
Sun, May 3, 2009
4:00pm
Memorial Gathering for Marjorie Grene - Special Event (Torgersen Hall)
All friends or fans of Marjorie Grene are invited to attend this memorial gathering for Marjorie Grene (1910-2009), Honorary Distinguished Professor of Philosophy. Reception to follow.
Tue, Jun 23, 2009
6:30pm
"Desk Top Graffiti as a Measure of Campus Climate" - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (Northern Virginia Center, 7054 Haycock Road, Falls Church, VA 22043)
William E. Snizek Presentation Virginia Tech Alumni Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies By studying the desk top graffiti, at Virginia Tech since December 2003, Snizek has been able to gauge the campus climate and student culture. Hear his thoughts about our attitudes towards race, security, politics, religion, and sex, drugs, and rock and roll! Wine, cheese, and other refreshments will be served
Thu, Aug 13, 2009
3:30pm
Open forum for VBI executive director candidate - Administration (Virginia Bioinformatics Conference Center)
The search committee for the executive director of the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute (VBI), chaired by University Distinguished Professor Paul Knox, has announced the final candidates selected from a strong group of applicants. Dr. Kenneth Tew will be visiting the Blacksburg campus for two days to meet the university community. An open forum will be held at the VBI conference center, which is located on Washington St. on the Virginia Tech campus.
Tue, Sep 1, 2009
3:30pm
Open forum for VBI executive director candidate Dr. Harold "Skip" Garner - Administration (Virginia Bioinformatics Conference Center)
The search committee for the executive director of the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute (VBI), chaired by University Distinguished Professor Paul Knox, has announced the final candidates selected from a strong group of applicants. Dr. Harold "Skip" Garner will be visiting the Blacksburg campus for two days to meet the university community. An open forum will be held at the VBI conference center, which is located on Washington St. on the Virginia Tech campus. His talk is titled, "At the interface of Biology, Medicine, and the Physical Sciences: Exploiting this territory now and into the future"
Fri, Oct 30, 2009
11:15am
Distinguished Lecture - The Impact of Virtualization on Modern Computing Environments - Academic (Whittemore 300)
In this talk I will discuss the problems of modern enterprise computing environments and virtualization, a layer of software inserted between the hardware and the existing software stack, which can address these problems. I will describe how virtualization helps with problems ranging from inefficient hardware utilization and poor power management to high system management costs. In spite of its high compatibility that has allowed it to be initially deployed with limited disruptions, I will argue that virtualization will change commonly held views on the relationship between software and hardware and has the potential of a massive disruption in the computing industry. I will discuss these trends in the context of software distribution models, operating systems, and cloud computing.
Sat, Oct 31, 2009
3:30pm
Distinguished Theatre/Cinema Alumni Panel Discussion - Special Event (Squires Studio Theatre)
Theatre and cinema alumni with varied career paths join actress/writer Michelle Krusiec in an open discussion of their experiences in the film and theatre industries.
Fri, Nov 6, 2009
Law Symposium - Fall 2009 - Violence on Campus - Seminar/Conference (Washington and Lee University School of Law, Millhiser Moot Court Room)
Lucinda Roy, Alumni Distinguished Professor in the English Department, and author of 'No Right to Remain Silent' will be featured as a keynote speaker as Washington and Lee School of Law holds the annual Law Symposium sponsored by the Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice, the Frances Lewis Law Center, and Barbri. This year's symposium title is Violence on Campus: Students Who are a Danger to Self or Others and Appropriate Institutional Responses.
Fri, Nov 6, 2009
12:00pm
Enterprise GIS: Furthering Research Through GIS Technology - Special Event (The Virginia Tech Roanoke Center)
Seth Peery will present a lecture at the Virginia Tech Roanoke Center as part of their Distinguished Faculty Research Forum series. The event is free and the public is invited to attend. Make your reservation by calling (540) 767-6100 or emailing vtroanoke@vt.edu.
Fri, Nov 6, 2009
4:00pm
Graphical Systems Design: Innovative Technologies for Engineers and Scientists - Academic (300 Whittemore)
Dr. James Truchard, founder and CEO of National Instruments, will present Graphical Systems Design: Innovative Technologies for Engineers and Scientists. This seminar is part of the Bradley Distinguished Lecture series.
Fri, Nov 6, 2009
4:00pm
VT Graduate Philosophy Conference--Contemporary Philosophy of Science - Seminar/Conference (Torgersen 3100)
The VT Graduate Philosophy Club welcomes the attendance of the Virginia Tech Community at its 6th annual graduate philosophy conference to take place on Friday, November 6th from 4pm-7:30pm and Saturday, November 7th from 9am-6:30pm in Torgersen 3100. The topic this year is contemporary philosophy of science and we are delighted to feature Dr. James F. Woodward, Professor of Philosophy at California Institute of Technology and President-Elect of the Philosophy of Science Association, as our keynote speaker. Dr. Woodward's address, "Causation in Biology: Stability, Specificity, and the Choice of Levels of Explanation", will be delivered at 6:00pm on November 6th, 2009 in Torgersen 3100. In addition to our distinguished keynote speaker, the conference will feature eight invited graduate speakers. Please visit our website at www.phil.vt.edu/events/gradconferences or contact Tanya Hall at TanyaHall@vt.edu for more information.
Sat, Nov 7, 2009
9:00am
VT Graduate Philosophy Conference--Contemporary Philosophy of Science - Seminar/Conference (Torgersen 3100)
The VT Graduate Philosophy Club welcomes the attendance of the Virginia Tech Community at its 6th annual graduate philosophy conference to take place on Friday, November 6th from 4pm-7:30pm and Saturday, November 7th from 9am-6:30pm in Torgersen 3100. The topic this year is contemporary philosophy of science and we are delighted to feature Dr. James F. Woodward, Professor of Philosophy at California Institute of Technology and President-Elect of the Philosophy of Science Association, as our keynote speaker. Dr. Woodward's address, "Causation in Biology: Stability, Specificity, and the Choice of Levels of Explanation", will be delivered at 6:00pm on November 6th, 2009 in Torgersen 3100. In addition to our distinguished keynote speaker, the conference will feature eight invited graduate speakers. Please visit our website at www.phil.vt.edu/events/gradconferences or contact Tanya Hall at TanyaHall@vt.edu for more information.
Mon, Nov 9, 2009
3:30pm
Rhapsody on a Darwinian Theme - Academic (1860 Litton Reaves)
Distinguished Alumni Professor Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis (Department of History and Department of Biology, University of Florida) will present a multi-media show entitled "Rhapsody on a Darwinian Theme: Darwin in Song in Musical Production" in the seminar series in Science, Technology, and Society. Abstract: This is a lecture on Darwin, his theory, and its expression in Anglo-American popular culture. It explores a number of substantive issues in the history of evolution pertaining to controversies over Darwin and the reception of his theory, but does so in a lighthearted and engaging manner (music will be played and discussed). The lecture is designed to introduce a general audience to the life of Darwin, to introduce some new insights about his work, and to provoke thought about the relationship between science and popular culture.
Fri, Nov 13, 2009
4:00pm
Distinguished Lecture Series in Philosophy - Academic (Torgerson 1060)
Professor Jeffrey Bub Quantum Games: Einstein and Bohr Meet Alice and Bob Abstract: Nonclassical correlations can be exploited to perform computational tasks that are apparently beyond the capacity of a classical computer, and to implement information-theoretic protocols (e.g., sharing a secret key between two parties) that can't be implemented by parties communicating with classical information. In this talk, I consider classical, quantum, and superquantum correlations in terms of two-person communication games in which the players are limited to certain resources. The weird features of quantum mechanics that Einstein called 'spooky action-at-a-distance' are features of the nonclassical correlations associated with games for which there is no winning strategy if the players are limited to classical resources, and the debate between Bohr and Einstein about how to understand quantum mechanics can be posed in terms of such games. Professor Bub is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the Institute for Physical Science and Technology at the University of Maryland.
Wed, Jan 27, 2010
6:00pm
Dr. Patricia Hill Collins "Does America Still Need Black People?" - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Dr. Patricia Hill Collins, Distinguished University Professor of Sociology at University of Maryland, College Park and past President of the American Sociological Association will provide her lecture "Does America Still Need Black People" in honor of Black History Month.
Wed, Jan 27, 2010
6:00pm
Does America Still Need Black People? - Special Event (Burruss Hall Auditorium)
Esteemed author, Dr. Patricia Hill Collins, Distinguished Professor of Sociology from the University of Maryland, College Park will share her thoughts during her presentation titled, Does America Still Need Black People?
Fri, Feb 5, 2010
4:00pm
Distinguished Lecture Series in Philosophy - Academic (Torgersen 1060)
"Resuscitating Cartesian Dualism", presented by Professor William Lycan, the William Rand Kenan Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Thu, Feb 18, 2010
7:00pm
"Getting Right With Gettysburg" - Special Event (Hotel Roanoke)
Distinguished Civil War historian Richard M. McMurry will present "Getting Right with Gettysburg" -- the second in an inaugural series of three lectures as the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies' William C. Latham Lecturer.
Fri, Feb 19, 2010
11:15am
Computer Science Distinguished Lecture Series - Academic (Torgerson Hall 2150)
The Department of Computer Science at Virginia Tech is pleased to host five eminent computer scientists as part of its 2009-2010 Distinguished Lecture Series. Here, Gregory Abowd, of Georgia Tech, will speak on "Ubiquitous Care: Case studies in human-centered technology for health and education."
Mon, Mar 1, 2010
12:15pm
Keith Gilyard - Featured Speaker - Special Event (Shanks Hall, Rm. 370)
Composition at Virginia Speakers Series Spring 2010 Colloquium presents Keith Gilyard from Penn State University on Monday, March 1 in Shanks Hall, Rm. 370. The title of his talk is "Keeping Our Heads in the Language Game: On Political Talk, King, and Obama" Keith Gilyard is currently a distinguished professor of English at Penn State. His research interests include intersections of African American English and composition practices; mapping the African American rhetorical tradition; the rhetorical aspects of African American expressive culture; critical race studies; American and African American literature; sociolinguistics; pedagogy; and poetry. He is the author of several books such as Liberation Memories: The Rhetoric and Poetics of John Oliver Killens (2003) and Rhetoric and Ethnicity (2004).
Thu, Mar 25, 2010
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Burruss auditorium)
An Evening of Perspective with Peggy Noonan. The Wall Street Journal columnist and best selling author will discuss current events, including issues related to domestic and foreign policy, the economy, and the Obama administration.
Fri, Mar 26, 2010
4:00pm
Bradley Distinguished Lecture - Academic (300 Whittemore Hall)
Norman Abramson of the University of Hawaii will give this year's Bradley Distinguished Lecture. He received an A.B. in physics from Harvard College in 1953, an M.A. in physics from UCLA in 1955, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1958. He was an assistant professor and associate professor of electrical engineering at Stanford from 1958 to 1965. From 1967 to 1995 he was professor of electrical engineering, professor of information and computer science, chairman of the Department of Information and Computer Science, and director of the ALOHA System at the University of Hawaii. He is now professor emeritus of electrical engineering at the University of Hawaii.
Fri, Apr 23, 2010
4:00pm
Distinguished Lecture Series in Philosophy - Academic (Pamplin 2030)
Talk by Professor Patricia Kitcher
Thu, Sep 2, 2010
3:30pm
The Foundations of Statistics: A Modern Perspective - Seminar/Conference (1060 TORGERSEN)
Professor Larry Wasserman (Departments of Statistics and Machine Learning at Carnegie Mellon) will deliever the inaugural "I.J. Good Lecture"* ABSTRACT: In the past, statisticians interested in the foundations of Statistics were mainly concerned with the debate on Bayesian versus non Bayesian approaches. Most discussions focused on models with one or two parameters. Our intuition about inference was heavily guided by these simple, low dimensional models. Now, we routinely deal with very complex, high-dimensional models. Statistical theory and methodology has outstripped our understanding of foundations because we tend to cling to our low-dimension intuition. I'll discuss some examples of high-dimensional inference including "sparse additive nonparametric regression", "stable density clustering", "semiparametric undirected graphs" and "minimax estimation of manifolds". One foundational lesson we learn from these examples is that conditional methods and Bayesian methods can fail terribly in high dimensions. Also, we should give up any pretense of "estimating the truth" and instead focus on making accurate predictions and finding sparse, stable structure. *Part of the Virginia Tech Distinguished Adjunct Lecture Series in Philosophy
Mon, Oct 11, 2010
11:00am
Macromolecular Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech: Enabling a Healthy and Sustainable World - Seminar/Conference (Holtzman Alumni Center and Skelton Conference Center at the Inn at Virginia)
The Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute at Virginia Tech 2010 Technical Conference and Review will present three distinguished plenary lecturers who will address polymeric materials from sustainable sources and polymeric materials that enable the efficient generation and storage of energy. The program includes five half-day sessions with 26 lectures from Virginia Tech faculty and two poster sessions featuring more than 100 student posters describing frontier polymer research across the university.
Tue, Oct 12, 2010
11:00am
Macromolecular Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech: Enabling a Healthy and Sustainable World - Seminar/Conference (Holtzman Alumni Center and Skelton Conference Center at the Inn at Virginia)
The Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute at Virginia Tech 2010 Technical Conference and Review will present three distinguished plenary lecturers who will address polymeric materials from sustainable sources and polymeric materials that enable the efficient generation and storage of energy. The program includes five half-day sessions with 26 lectures from Virginia Tech faculty and two poster sessions featuring more than 100 student posters describing frontier polymer research across the university.
Wed, Oct 13, 2010
11:00am
Macromolecular Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech: Enabling a Healthy and Sustainable World - Seminar/Conference (Holtzman Alumni Center and Skelton Conference Center at the Inn at Virginia)
The Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute at Virginia Tech 2010 Technical Conference and Review will present three distinguished plenary lecturers who will address polymeric materials from sustainable sources and polymeric materials that enable the efficient generation and storage of energy. The program includes five half-day sessions with 26 lectures from Virginia Tech faculty and two poster sessions featuring more than 100 student posters describing frontier polymer research across the university.
Fri, Oct 15, 2010
2:30pm
Inaugural Clifford Randall Distinguished Lecture - Academic (190 Holden Hall)
James Bernard of Black and Veatch, Kansas City, Mo., will present this inaugural lecture, titled "A History of Biological Phosphorous Removal." Dr. Bernard is responsible for developing the Bardenpho, MLE, and Phoredox processes for biological nitrogen and phosphorous removal. Dr. Bernard is a global practice and technology leader for advanced biological treatment.
Fri, Oct 22, 2010
1:30pm
Trent Distinguished Scholar Lecture - Special Event (Fralin Auditorium)
Lisa Holton, Founder and CEO of Fourth Story Media in New York City, will make a presentation entitled, "The Dancing Mind: How Digital Media is Transforming the Reading Experience for Children and Young Adults." She has worked at Scholastic Publishers, the Walt Disney Company, HarperCollins, and St. Martin's Press. Fourth Story Media is a creative studio that marries traditional books and digital media. Its first series, The Amanda Project, is a collaborative, interactive fiction series for teen girls, and was released in Fall 2009. It is a series of mystery novels and a website where girls can create their own characters and then participate in the ongoing story--which changes based on their contributions.
Fri, Oct 22, 2010
1:30pm
Trent Distinguished Scholar Lecture - Special Event (Fralin Auditorium)
"The Dancing Mind: How Digital Media is Transforming the Reading Experience for Children and Young Adults." Lisa Holton, Founder and CEO of Fourth Story Media in New York City, will make a presentation to the public in the Fralin Auditorium at 1:30 PM. Fourth Story Media is a creative studio that integrates traditional books and digital media. In Fall 2009, it launched its first series--a collaborative, interactive fiction series for teen girls called "The Amanda Project" (www.theamandaproject.com). It is a series of mystery novels and a website where girls create their own characters and then participate in the ongoing story. The readers can steer the course of the story based on their contributions. Prior to launching the new media start-up, Holton was President of Scholastic Trade Publishing and Book Fairs. During her tenure at Scholastic, Holton managed the publication of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" by J.K. Rowling and initiated and oversaw development of "The 39 Clues." During her watch, Scholastic published an impressive line-up of award-winning and best-selling books including "The Invention of Hugo Cabret," by Brian Selznick, "The Invention of Elijah of Bruxton," by Christopher Paul Curtis, and "Mommy!" by Maurice Sendak. Before joining Scholastic, Holton ran the Disney Global Children's Books division at the Walt Disney Company, during which she built the Hyperion Books for Children division. She also started "Jump at the Sun," an imprint devoted exclusively to African-American culture and literature. Holton was Vice President, Associate Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of HarperCollins Children's Books.
Fri, Nov 5, 2010
2:00pm
Charlie L. Yates Memorial Service - Special Event (War Memorial Chapel)
A memorial service will be held Nov. 5 from 2 pm until 3 pm in the War Memorial Chapel to honor Charlie L. Yates who passed away August 11, 2010. The memorial service will begin with opening remarks from William Lewis, vice president for Diversity and Inclusion and will include comments from Charles W. Steger, president of Virginia Tech; Richard Benson, dean, College of Engineering; and Lucinda Roy, Alumni Distinguished Professor. The service will conclude with a selection from the Virginia Tech Regimental Band.
Fri, Nov 12, 2010
8:00am
Computer Science - 40th anniversary - Academic (2202 Kraft Drive)
Virginia Tech's Department of Computer Science will celebrate its 40th anniversary Nov. 12-14, 2010. It is welcoming alumni. Watch the CS web site. Planned events include: a two hour kick-off reintroduction to the department, Alumni Distinguished Lecture, networking social, tours of new CS buildings and labs, visits with current students and faculty, and one-on-one interaction with faculty.
Fri, Dec 3, 2010
3:00pm
"Einstein as a Philosopher of Science" - Academic (Torgersen 3100)
Description: A talk in the Philosophy Department Distinguished Lecture Series. Don Howard, professor of Philosophy and Director of the Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Notre Dame, will give the lecture. Anyone interested in the scientific career of Albert Einstein, and especially in Einstein's engagement with philosophers, will find this talk engaging and stimulating.
Thu, Jan 27, 2011
1:30pm
Agriculture in Nepal - Special Event (Conference Room A, International Affairs Offices (526 Prices Fork Road))
Four distinguished visitors from Nepal's Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives (MOAC) will make a presentation on topics relating to agriculture in Nepal.
Fri, Mar 18, 2011
3:00pm
STS Spring 2011 Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (129 McBryde)
The Atom and the Ecosystem Burian McNabb Distinguished Lecture Angela Creager (Princeton University)
Fri, Mar 18, 2011
3:00pm
Seventh Annual Burian/McNabb Distinguished Lecture - Seminar/Conference (129 McBryde)

Sun, Mar 20, 2011
3:00pm
Music and Memories of the Civil War - Music/Theatre/Dance (Burruss Auditorium)
Back by popular demand, the Department of Music once again presents a concert of "Music and Memories of the Civil War," featuring the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, choirs, and faculty soloists. Alumni Distinguished Professor in History James I. "Bud" Robertson, Jr., serves as narrator for this special event.
Sun, Mar 20, 2011
3:00pm
Music and Memories of the Civil War - Music/Theatre/Dance (Burruss Auditorium)
Back by popular demand, the Department of Music once again presents a concert of "Music and Memories of the Civil War," featuring the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, choirs, and faculty soloists. Alumni Distinguished Professor in History James I. "Bud" Robertson, Jr., serves as narrator for this special event. Tickets may be ordered with a credit card online at www.uusa.vt.edu/tickets, by phone at 540.231.5615 (a $4 per order processing fee applies), and in person at the UUSA ticket office on the lower level of Squires Student Center. Tickets also available at the door.
Thu, Mar 24, 2011
11:00am
Farmers' Market on the Plaza - Special Event (GLC Plaza)
Vendors from the Blacksburg Farmers' Market will bring some of their wonderful produce/fruit to the GLC PLaza. Fred Kirschnmann, distinguished fellow for the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University, will visit the market from 2-3pm to meet and greet students. Enjoy local produced food and crafts and chat with a notable advocate of sustainable food and farming systems.
Thu, Mar 24, 2011
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Leadership in a Changing World: Bill Bradley, former NBA player, U.S. senator, and presidential candidate
Fri, Mar 25, 2011
12:00pm
Lecture: New studies of epigenetic developmental processes in primates - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, room R1059)
Speaker Stephen J. Suomi, Ph.D. Chief, Laboratory of Comparative Ethology National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda MD Hosts Sharon L. Ramey, Ph.D., Distinguished Research Scholar, VTCRI Michael J. Friedlander, Ph.D., Executive Director, VTCR
Fri, Mar 25, 2011
3:00pm
The Commercialization of Science as Ponzi Scheme(s) - Seminar/Conference (2150 Torgersen)
The Commercialization of Science and Other Ponzi Schemes Nicholas Mullins Distinguished Lecture Philip Mirowski (University of Notre Dame)
Tue, Mar 29, 2011
7:30pm
Alumni sponsor James I. Robertson Jr. Civil War Lecture - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (Evergreen Manor House and Country Club, 15900 Berkeley Dr., Haymarket, VA)
Nationally acclaimed lecturer and Civil War historian James I. Robertson Jr., is alumni distinguished professor of history at Virginia Tech. His Civil War era course at Virginia Tech, which attracts 300 students per semester, is the largest of its kind in the nation. Robertson served as executive director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and worked with Presidents Harry Truman, John Kennedy, and Lyndon Johnson in marking the war's 100th anniversary. Robertson has received every major award in the Civil War arena and is a charter member (by Senate appointment) of Virginia's Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. Registration is required for this event. Alumni may register on the NCR Alumni Chapter website by clicking on the "More Information" link below. Others who wish to register for this event should contact Scott Pence at his email address listed below. An optional buffet dinner will be held prior to the event, at 5:15 p.m. This is cash only and a reservation is required. Call 703-754-4125. This event is jointly sponsored by the NCR Chapter and the Prince William Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association.
Thu, Apr 14, 2011
11:00am
BB&T Distinguished Lecture: Grep Ip - Seminar/Conference (Inn at Virginia Tech, Latham Ballroom)
Greg Ip is U.S. economics editor for The Economist, based in Washington D.C. He covers the economy, financial markets, monetary, fiscal and regulatory policy. His talk is titled "The Post-Crisis American Economy."
Thu, Apr 14, 2011
4:00pm
Panel on Childhood Nutrition - Special Event (The Lyric Theater, 135 College Ave, Blacksburg, VA)
You are invited to engage in dialogue with your community about the important topic of children's nutrition in the New River Valley. Please attend the Children's Nutrition panel at the Lyric Theatre in Blacksburg, Virginia on April 14th from 4:00 until 6:00 PM: Our distinguished panel members include: -Colleen Kraft, MD Pediatrics -Michael Marcenelle, Supervisor of School Nutrition Programs, Montgomery County Schools -Mary McFerren, PhD Family Nutrition Program Director -Elena Serrano, PhD Department of Human, Nutrition, Foods and Exercise at Virginia Tech -Pastor John Wertz, St. Michael's Lutheran Church Micah's Backpack program director
Fri, Apr 29, 2011
11:15am
Moishe Vardi, Rice University: "Logic Begat Computer Science: When Giants Roamed the Earth" - Seminar/Conference (2150 Torgersen)
Department of Computer Science Distinguished Lecture "Logic Begat Computer Science: When Giants Roamed the Earth" During the past fifty years there has been extensive, continuous, and growing interaction between logic and computer science. In fact, logic has been called "the calculus of computer science". The argument is that logic plays a fundamental role in computer science, similar to that played by calculus in the physical sciences and traditional engineering disciplines. Indeed, logic plays an important role in areas of computer science as disparate as architecture (logic gates), software engineering (specification and verification), programming languages (semantics, logic programming), databases (relational algebra and SQL), artificial intelligence (automated theorem proving), algorithms (complexity and expressiveness), and theory of computation (general notions of computability). This non-technical talk will provide an overview of the unusual effectiveness of logic in computer science by surveying the history of logic in computer science, going back all the way to Aristotle and Euclid, and showing how logic actually gave rise to computer science. Bio: Moshe Y. Vardi is the George Professor in Computational Engineering and Director of the Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology at Rice University. He chaired the Computer Science Department at Rice University from January 1994 till June 2002. Prior to joining Rice in 1993, he was at the IBM Almaden Research Center, where he managed the Mathematics and Related Computer Science Department. His research interests include database systems, computational-complexity theory, multi-agent systems, and design specification and verification. Vardi received his Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1981. He is the author and co-author of over 350 articles, as well as two books, "Reasoning about Knowledge" and "Finite Model Theory and Its Applications", and the editor of several collections. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Communications of the ACM. Vardi is the recipient of numerous awards, including three IBM Outstanding Innovation Awards, the 2000 Goedel Prize, the 2005 ACM Kanellakis Award for Theory and Practice, the 2006 LICS Test-of-Time Award, the 2008 ACM PODS Mendelzon Test-of-Time Award, the 2008 ACM SIGMOD Codd Innovations Award, the 2008 Blaise pascal Medal for Computer Science by the European Academy of Sciences, the 2008 ACM Presidential Award, the 2010 CRA Distinguished Service Award, and the 2010 ACM Outstanding Contribution Award. He holds honorary doctorates from the University of Saarland, Germany, and the University of Orleans, France. Vardi is an editor of several international journals, and Editor-in-Chief of the Communication of ACM. He is Guggenheim Fellow, as well as a Fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He was designated Highly Cited Researcher by the Institute for Scientific Information, and was elected as a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Science, the European Academy of Sciences, and the Academia Europea.
Thu, Sep 8, 2011
5:30pm
You Must Remember This: The Principles of Memory Formation - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, VTC M203)
One of the nation's leading experts on the molecular biology of learning and memory, Ron Davis, PhD, will deliver a public lecture on how the brain forms, stores, and retrieves memories. A public reception will precede this event in the VTC Cafe at 4:30 until 5:15 p.m. *Speaker* Ron Davis, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Scripps Research Institute Department of Neuroscience, Jupiter, Florida This event is part of the Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/about/distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/ A live webcast will be available here: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/events/2011/sep/08/principles-memory-formation-you-must-remember/
Fri, Sep 9, 2011
1:00pm
The Molecular Biology of Memory Formation - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, VTC M203)
Ron Davis, PhD, will deliver a lecture on his current research titled "Molecular Biology of Memory Formation" as part of the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute's Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series (http://research.vtc.vt.edu/about/distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/) *Speaker* Ron Davis, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Scripps Research Institute Department of Neuroscience, Jupiter, Florida
Fri, Sep 9, 2011
4:00pm
Creativity of Natural Selection & Boundaries of the Modern Synthesis - Seminar/Conference (3100 Torgersen Hall)
The Virginia Tech Distinguished Adjunct Lecture Series in Philosophy presents Professor David Depew (Department of Communication Studies, University of Iowa, Emeritus) to give The Marjorie Grene Lecture. Abstract: This paper analyzes a commonplace that I contend marks off the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis from earlier forms of genetic Darwinism and perhaps from some new forms as well. I discriminate three meanings of the creativity ascribed to natural selection by genetic Darwinism....The present importance of this topic springs from the circumstance that proposals for revising the Modern Synthesis in the light of currently cascading knowledge about the role of genes in development sometimes calls natural selection's creativity into question. Since, as I will argue, the creativity of natural selection is a basic plank of population-genetical Darwinism, and so of the Modern Synthesis in all its forms, withdrawal of that creativity points toward a new, not an expanded or extended, Synthesis.
Tue, Sep 20, 2011
7:00pm
An Evening with Dr. Todd Kashdan Author of 'Curious? Discover the Missing Ingredient to a Fulfilling Life' - Special Event (Great Room (located on the second floor) of the Honors Residential College in Ambler Johnston Hall)
The Division of Student Affairs, Curiosity Committee invites students to spend an evening with Dr. Todd Kashdan, author of 'Curious? Discover the Missing Ingredient to a Fulfilling Life' on Sept. 20, 2011 from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. in the Great Room of the Honors Residential College in Ambler Johnston Hall. Kashdan's broad mission is to increase the amount of well-being in the world. He uses cutting edge science to help people function optimally in life and business. He is Associate Professor of Psychology and Senior Scientist at the Center for Consciousness and Transformation at George Mason University where he received the 2010 Distinguished Faculty Member of the Year award. Kashdan is a clinical psychologist, trained in cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness approaches. To date, his clinical work and research has focused on anxiety, positive emotions, purpose in life, how personal strengths operate in everyday life, social relationships, and how to foster and sustain happiness and meaning in life. For more than 10 years he has taught college courses on the science of happiness. To learn more about Kashdan's work visit http://www.toddkashdan.com or http://www.psychfaculty.gmu.edu/kashdan
Thu, Oct 6, 2011
8:00pm
Guest artist recital: Kenneth Prewitt, tenor - Music/Theatre/Dance (Squires Recital Salon)
Kenneth Prewitt performs an evening guest recital. Mr. Prewitt is the Voice Area Chair and an Assistant Professor in the School of Music at Western Michigan University, where he teaches applied voice. Prewitt received the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in voice performance from the University of South Carolina, and Master of Arts and Bachelor of Arts degrees in voice performance from Bob Jones University. His distinguished teachers include Willis Patterson, Waldy Anderson, Glenda Maurice, Rachel Mathes, Richard Miller, Gene Ferguson, and coach Stephen Dubberly. A tenor, Prewitt has sung major opera and oratorio roles with the Columbia Lyric Opera, Bob Jones Opera Association, Greenville (South Carolina) Chorale and Chamber Singers, Long Bay Symphony, Columbia Choral Society, Greater Anderson Musical Arts Consortium, Wichita Chamber Chorale, and Reno Choral Society. He has performed as an oratorio soloist in Bach's Magnificat, Bruckner's Te Deum, Handel's Messiah, Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass, Mendelssohn's Elijah, Mozart's Solemn Vespers, and Vaughan Williams' Serenade to Music. His stage experience includes roles in Andrea Chenier, Amahl and the Night Visitors, Die Fledermaus, Faust, The Merry Wives of Windsor, and Rigoletto. He has presented solo recitals in Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Colorado, and South Carolina, and in Mexico City, Mexico; Seoul, South Korea; and Pohang, South Korea. Guest artist recitals are $5 General, $3 Senior and $3 Students. Tickets are available at the door of the venue one hour prior to the performance.
Fri, Oct 7, 2011
4:00pm
The Vecellio Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (2150 Torgersen Hall)
John R. Hillman, PE, will speak on "One Perspective on Innovation" on Friday, Oct. 7 at 4 p.m. This lecture will present examples of innovation using many different aspects.
Fri, Oct 14, 2011
3:00pm
Seminar: Victor H. Reis, DOE - Seminar/Conference (900 N. Glebe Rd, Arlington, W. Falls Church Rm., 2nd floor; video-link to Norris Hall, Rm. 209)
Victor H. Reis, senior advisor, Office of Science and Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy, will present "Impact of Policy on Science and Technology Innovation: Some Real World Examples from Apollo to Small Modular Reactors." His talk will focus on: *Sputnik and Apollo: Global Leadership in Manned Space Program *Stockpile Stewardship: Nuclear Deterrence without Nuclear Testing *Global Nuclear Energy Partnership/DOE Program in Small Modular Reactors: Restoring U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Leadership Reis had primary responsibility for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, part of President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative. From 1999 to 2005 he was senior vice president of Hicks and Associates, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). He served as a member of the Strategic Advisory Group of the U.S. Strategic Command; the Sandia National Laboratory National Security Advisory Panel; the Argonne National Laboratory Board of Governors; the NNSA's Predictive Science and Independent Capability Review Committees; and he chaired the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory National Security Panel and Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Physics External Review Committee. His many awards include two Department of Defense Distinguished Public Service Medals.
Fri, Oct 14, 2011
3:00pm
Seminar: Victor H. Reis, DOE - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Rd, Arlington, W. Falls Church Rm., 2nd floor; video-link to Norris Hall, Rm. 209)
Victor H. Reis, senior advisor, Office of Science and Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy, will present "Impact of Policy on Science and Technology Innovation: Some Real World Examples from Apollo to Small Modular Reactors." His talk will focus on: *Sputnik and Apollo: Global Leadership in Manned Space Program *Stockpile Stewardship: Nuclear Deterrence without Nuclear Testing *Global Nuclear Energy Partnership/DOE Program in Small Modular Reactors: Restoring U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Leadership Reis had primary responsibility for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, part of President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative. From 1999 to 2005 he was senior vice president of Hicks and Associates, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). He served as a member of the Strategic Advisory Group of the U.S. Strategic Command; the Sandia National Laboratory National Security Advisory Panel; the Argonne National Laboratory Board of Governors; the NNSA's Predictive Science and Independent Capability Review Committees; and he chaired the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory National Security Panel and Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Physics External Review Committee. His many awards include two Department of Defense Distinguished Public Service Medals.
Thu, Oct 20, 2011
5:30pm
Parallel Universes: G's and A's in Autoimmunity - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, M203)
Robert Kimberly, MD Howard L. Holley Professor of Medicine Senior Associate Dean for Research Director of the Comprehensive Arthritis Musculoskeletal and Autoimmunity Center University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine Autoimmune diseases--which are often chronic, debilitating, and life-threatening--affect millions of people in the United States alone. Robert Kimberly, MD, will explain the role that two types of autoimmune molecules, IgG and IgA autoantibodies, play in these diseases. He will also describe the importance of biologically significant, genetically determined differences in shaping the response to these antibodies. In the autoimmune disorder Wegener's granulomatosis, for example, the combination of IgA autoantibody and specific receptor variants is strongly associated with kidney damage. This relationship sets the paradigm for the coming together of the sciences of genomics and proteomics for predictive personalized medicine. Robert Kimberly, MD, is the Howard L. Holley Professor of Medicine at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, where he is also the senior associate dean for research and director of the UAB Comprehensive Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Autoimmunity Center. A rheumatologist and immunologist, Dr. Kimberly conducts research aimed at understanding the role of genetic factors in the normal function of the immune system and in the development of immunological diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic vasculitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. This lecture is part of the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series. Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast/ Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, VTCRI A public reception will precede this event in the VTC Cafe at 4:30 p.m.
Fri, Oct 21, 2011
1:00pm
Genetic Architecture in Autoimmunity: Shaping the Response to Stimulation - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, M203)
Robert Kimberly, MD Howard L. Holley Professor of Medicine Senior Associate Dean for Research Director of the Comprehensive Arthritis Musculoskeletal and Autoimmunity Center University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine This seminar will review the current insights into the heritable genetic variation in human immune system molecules that influence our risk for developing autoimmune disease. Antibody formation as part of the humoral immune response and the interaction of these antibodies with their cognate receptors are central to immune host defense. Mechanisms that enhance our response to vaccines also increase the risk of autoimmune disease. Robert Kimberly, MD, is the Howard L. Holley Professor of Medicine at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, where he is also the senior associate dean for research and director of the UAB Comprehensive Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Autoimmunity Center. A rheumatologist and immunologist, Dr. Kimberly conducts research aimed at understanding the role of genetic factors in the normal function of the immune system and in the development of immunological diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic vasculitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. This lecture is part of the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series. Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast/ Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, VTCRI
Thu, Oct 27, 2011
5:30pm
How Electron Cryotomography Is Opening a New Window into Bacterial Ultrastructure - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, M203)
Grant Jensen, PhD Professor of Biology California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California For decades microbiologists thought bacteria were little more than "bags" of enzymes, without cytoskeletons or internal organization. By allowing intact cells to be imaged in 3-D in a near-native state to macromolecular resolution, the emerging technique of electron cryotomography is rapidly changing that notion, revealing a wealth of information about how bacteria generate specific cell shapes, monitor their environment, swim toward favorable locations, produce and store energy, grow, and, finally, divide. This presentation will be a visual tour through bacterial cell biology. Grant Jensen, PhD, earned his doctorate in biophysics at Stanford University before undertaking a postdoctoral fellowship at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In 2002, he joined the faculty of the California Institute of Technology, where he is now an associate professor of biology. He has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator since 2008. His laboratory uses state-of-the-art electron cryomicroscopy techniques to understand the structure and function of large protein machines and their arrangement within cells. His projects range from theoretical studies on the mathematics of three-dimensional reconstructions to direct imaging of individual protein complexes to tomography of viruses and cells. He hopes eventually to combine these results with the vast data emerging from genomics, proteomics, and structural genomics to enable authentic, whole-cell simulations that allow the rational design of entirely new species for the production of clean fuels, water desalination, bioremediation, and medical applications. This lecture is part of the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series. Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast/ Other notes: A public reception will precede this event in the VTC Cafe at 4:30 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, VTCRI
Fri, Oct 28, 2011
1:00pm
Imaging Intact Cells in 3-D in Near-Native States to Macromolecular Resolution: Case Studies and Future Prospects - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, M203)
Grant Jensen, PhD Professor of Biology California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California Grant Jensen, PhD, will discuss the contributions, limitations, and future prospects of electron cryotomography using specific biological case studies, including the bacterial actin-homolog MreB, chemoreceptor arrays, sporulation, and the HIV life cycle. Grant Jensen, PhD, earned his doctorate in biophysics at Stanford University before undertaking a postdoctoral fellowship at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In 2002, he joined the faculty of the California Institute of Technology, where he is now an associate professor of biology. He has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator since 2008. His laboratory uses state-of-the-art electron cryomicroscopy techniques to understand the structure and function of large protein machines and their arrangement within cells. His projects range from theoretical studies on the mathematics of three-dimensional reconstructions to direct imaging of individual protein complexes to tomography of viruses and cells. He hopes eventually to combine these results with the vast data emerging from genomics, proteomics, and structural genomics to enable authentic, whole-cell simulations that allow the rational design of entirely new species for the production of clean fuels, water desalination, bioremediation, and medical applications. This lecture is part of the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series. Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast/ Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, VTCRI
Fri, Nov 4, 2011
9:00am
Interdisciplinary Research Conference - Academic (Graduate Life Center Multipurpose Rom)
The Interdisciplinary Research Honor Society invites the university community to its inaugural Interdisciplinary Research Symposium at Virginia Tech. The goal for this symposium is not only to create a dialog for researchers working at the frontier of their disciplines, but also to create a unique perspective on interdisciplinary research at Virginia Tech and nationwide. Distinguished researchers will provide talks on the interdisciplinary aspects of their work and share their unique experience on the challenges they encounter. Undergraduate and graduate students can equally participate in the poster session and compete for poster awards. Coffee and lunch break provided.
Fri, Nov 11, 2011
11:15am
Distinguished Lecture in Computer Science - Lori Clark and Leon J. Osterweil: Using Process Definition and Analysis Techniques to Reduce Errors and Improve Efficiency in the Delivery of Healthcare - Seminar/Conference (2150 Torgersen Hall)
As has been widely reported in the news lately, heathcare errors are a major cause of death and suffering, and healthcare inefficiencies result in escalating costs. In the University of Massachusetts Medical Safety Project, we are investigating if process definition and analysis technologies can be used to help reduce heathcare errors and improve heathcare efficiency. Specifically, we are modeling healthcare processes using a process definition language and then analyzing these processes using model checking, fault-tree analysis, discrete event simulation, and other analysis techniques. Working with the UMASS School of Nursing and the Baystate Medical Center, we are undertaking in-depth case studies on error-prone and life-critical healthcare processes. In many ways, these processes are similar to complex, distributed systems with many interacting, concurrent threads and numerous exceptional conditions that must be handled carefully. This talk describes the technologies we are using, discusses case studies, and presents our observations and findings to date. Although presented in terms of the healthcare domain, the described approach could be applied to human-intensive processes in other domains to provide a technology-driven approach to process improvement.
Fri, Nov 11, 2011
2:30pm
Clifford W. Randall Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Owens Hall Banquet Room)
John Young, P.E., will deliver the Randall Lecture on "Water and Wastewater Infrastructure System Challenges: Lessons Learned While Saving a Major Municipal Wastewater Utility from Bankruptcy."
Thu, Dec 1, 2011
5:30pm
Why Tools of the Mind and Montessori Educational Approaches Can Help Executive Function Skills - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute M203)
Adele Diamond, PhD Canada Research Chair Professor in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience in the Department of Psychiatry University of British Columbia Vancouver "Executive functions" (EFs) refer to the cognitive-control abilities dependent on the prefrontal cortex, such as selective attention, self-control, problem-solving, reasoning, and not getting into trouble. These abilities can be improved through training and practice. They are also particularly susceptible to disruption by stress, lack of sleep, loneliness, or lack of exercise. Conversely, what nourishes the human spirit, it turns out, is also best for the exercise of EFs. Diverse activities have been shown to improve children's EFs, including computerized training with or without other types of games, aerobics, martial arts, yoga, mindfulness, playing a musical instrument, and school curricula. Regardless of the intervention, two key principles seem to hold. First, EFs need to be continually challenged; if EF demands do not keep increasing as children improve, few gains are seen. Second, whether EF gains are seen depends on the way an activity is done and the amount of time spent doing it, practicing and pushing oneself to do better. It's the discipline, the practice, that produces the benefits. Even the best activity for improving EFs produces little benefit if done rarely. Dr. Adele Diamond, whose research specialty is the prefrontal cortex (PFC), declares that PFC is overrated. To learn something new, she holds, we need PFC. But after something is no longer new, people who recruit PFC least perform best. Older brain regions have had far longer to perfect their functioning; they can subserve task performance ever so much more efficiently than can PFC. A child may know intellectually (at the level of PFC) that he should not hit another, but in the heat of the moment if that knowledge has not become automatic (passed on from PFC to subcortical regions) the child will hit another (though if asked, he knows he should not do so). The only way something becomes automatic (becomes passed off from PFC) is through repeated action. Nothing else will do. School curricula empirically shown to improve EFs share several features in common. First, the classroom is not centered around the teacher, and the teacher is rarely expected to teach all children the same thing at the same time. Instead, children progress at their own individual rates. They work largely on their own and with one or a few other children. They help mentor other children and work cooperatively. Because other children are productively engaged when the teacher works with any individual child, individualized instruction can readily be provided and the teacher can spend time observing and assessing each child's progress, seeing where assistance or new challenges might be needed for a particular child. Finally, children are required neither to sit still for long nor to learn primarily by listening rather than doing. These approaches minimize stress for both teachers and students. Rather than acting as primary enforcers of rules, teachers encourage internal self-discipline. Students are rarely embarrassed or shamed. Teachers provide supports that ensure that children are far more likely to succeed than to fail. Even young children plan what they are going to do. Extrinsic rewards, such as stickers, are absent; exploration, discovery, and mastery are seen as their own rewards. Character development--such as the fostering of a spirit of kindness and helpfulness--is a priority. Social inclusiveness and mutual support are cultivated among the students. The most effective way to improve EFs and academic achievement is to address the child's full social, emotional, and physical development. Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast/ This event is part of the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series. A public reception will precede this event in the VTC Cafe at 4:30 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, VTCRI
Fri, Dec 2, 2011
1:00pm
Executive Functions and the Prefrontal Cortex: Genetic and Neurochemical Influences, Gender Differences, and Practical Activities and Approaches to Help - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, M203)
Adele Diamond, PhD Canada Research Chair Professor in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience in the Department of Psychiatry University of British Columbia Vancouver Disturbances in cognitive-control functions that depend on the prefrontal cortex--the "executive functions," such as attentional control, self-regulation, working memory, and cognitive flexibility--are found in a great many mental disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and depression. In this research seminar, Dr. Adele Diamond will address: * What executive functions are. * Bidirectional relations between the prefrontal cortex (executive functions) and the amygdala (stress). Even mild stress selectively impacts the prefrontal cortex (PFC). At the same time, PFC can help in the management of stress. Translating an emotional experience into coherent prose alters the way it is represented and understood in our minds and our brains. * Genetic influences. The special properties of the dopamine neurons that project to PFC make PFC especially sensitive to variations in certain genes that have much less effect on other brain regions. * Executive function deficits in people with phenylketonuria. Because of the unusually high baseline rate of firing of the dopamine neurons that project to PFC and because of the unusually high rate of dopamine turnover in PFC, PFC is unusually sensitive to small reductions in the availability of tyrosine, a dopamine precursor. Hence, people with a polymorphism of the PAH gene causing phenylketonuria are vulnerable to selective deficits in the executive functions that depend on PFC if too little tyrosine reaches their brains because of slightly elevated plasma levels of phenylalanine. * Gender differences. Because PFC has a paucity of dopamine transporter protein, it is more dependent on secondary mechanisms for clearing released dopamine, such as the COMT enzyme. Hence variations in the COMT gene selective affect PFC. Since estrogen downregulates COMT transcription, however, there are gender (and menstrual phase) differences in effects of variations in the COMT gene. * Implications for the classroom. Behavioral interventions with young children may head off problems before they lead to diagnoses of impairments in frontal lobe functions. This talk will provide evidence that executive functions can be improved even in very young children in regular classrooms, with regular teachers, and without special equipment. Educational practices that improve executive functions may not only lead to better academic outcomes, but may also head off problems before they lead to a diagnosis of an executive function impairment such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Many issues are not simply education issues or mental or physical health issues; they are all of those at once. Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast/ This event is part of the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, VTCRI
Mon, Dec 5, 2011
1:25pm
Prof. William J. Koros - "Evolutionary Steps Toward a Revolution in Separation and Purification Processes" - Seminar/Conference (310 ICTAS I Building)
Bill and Ann Doumas / Dow Checmical Company Distinguished Lecture
Thu, Dec 8, 2011
4:00pm
Steroid Hormones and Cancer - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Jan-Ake Gustafsson, MD, PhD Professor of Biology and Biochemistry Director, Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling University of Houston Houston, Texas A public lecture in the Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Dr. Jan-Ake Gustafsson will describe how steroid hormones such as estrogens (female sex hormones) and androgens (male sex hormones) are involved in cancer causation. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 3:15 to 4:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Dec 9, 2011
1:00pm
Estrogen Receptor Beta: A Tumor Suppressor - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Jan-Ake Gustafsson, MD, PhD Professor of Biology and Biochemistry Director, Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling University of Houston Houston, Texas A research seminar in the Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Dr. Jan-Ake Gustafsson will describe how estrogens--through two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta--may be involved in both cancer causation and cancer prevention. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 12, 2012
5:30pm
Neurotransmitter Transporters: Tales of Structure, Function, and Biology - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Susan Amara, PhD Tom Detre Professor and Chair of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh President, Society for Neuroscience A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Dr. Susan Amara's research focuses on the molecular pharmacology of neurotransmitter transporters and the regulation of chemical signaling in the brain. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Jan 13, 2012
1:00pm
A New Take on Uptake: Neurotransmitter Transporters and the Activation of Cellular Signaling Pathways by Amphetamines - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Susan Amara, PhD Tom Detre Professor and Chair of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh President, Society for Neuroscience A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Dr. Susan Amara's research focuses on the molecular pharmacology of neurotransmitter transporters and the regulation of chemical signaling in the brain. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 19, 2012
5:30pm
Evolution of an Adaptive Immune System of Defense - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Max D. Cooper, MD Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, Georgia A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series All living organisms have innate immune systems that can be used for self-defense. An adaptive immune system that is capable of recognizing specific pathogens and providing protective memory against a second encounter is found only in vertebrate species, however, including humans. Alternative adaptive immune systems have recently been defined in jawed and jawless vertebrates. Both employ lymphocytes with a wide variety of anticipatory receptors, but they differ in that lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates (lampreys and hagfish) use leucine-rich-repeat-based variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for antigen recognition, whereas lymphocytes in vertebrates with jaws use immunoglobulin-based receptors for the same purpose. The VLR antigen receptors are expressed in a clonally diverse fashion by separate populations of lymphocytes that resemble our thymus-derived T lymphocytes and bone marrow-derived B lymphocytes. Using parallels and differences between our adaptive immune system and that of lampreys and hagfish, Dr. Cooper will explore interesting questions about how adaptive immunity may have evolved. He will also address the potential for biomedical uses of antibodies found in the primitive lamprey. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Jan 20, 2012
1:00pm
Lessons from the Lamprey: Monoclonal Antibodies and Their Biophysical Features - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Max D. Cooper, MD Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, Georgia A research seminar in the Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series All living organisms have innate immune systems that can be used for self-defense. An adaptive immune system that is capable of recognizing specific pathogens and providing protective memory against a second encounter is found only in vertebrate species, however, including humans. Alternative adaptive immune systems have recently been defined in jawed and jawless vertebrates. Both employ lymphocytes with a wide variety of anticipatory receptors, but they differ in that lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates (lampreys and hagfish) use leucine-rich-repeat-based variable lymphocyte receptors for antigen recognition, whereas lymphocytes in vertebrates with jaws use immunoglobulin-based receptors for the same purpose. This research seminar will provide more detailed information about the generation of monoclonal antibodies and their biophysical features in lampreys. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 26, 2012
5:30pm
New Approaches to Treating Chronic Pain: Targeting Central Sensitization - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Robert Gereau, PhD Professor of Anesthesiology, Anatomy and Neurobiology Chief, Basic Science Division Washington University Pain Center St. Louis, Missouri A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Chronic pain conditions are largely unresponsive to treatments that are highly effective for acute pain conditions. Advances in pain science have led to the understanding that chronic pain conditions involve long-lasting changes in the way the brain processes sensory information. Dr. Gereau will discuss these changes and how they might be targeted with new types of therapies to provide effective relief for patients suffering from chronic pain. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Jan 27, 2012
1:00pm
Amygdala Plasticity as a Neural Substrate for Chronic Pain - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Robert Gereau, PhD Professor of Anesthesiology, Anatomy and Neurobiology Chief, Basic Science Division Washington University Pain Center St. Louis, Missouri A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Building on his public lecture, New Approaches to Treating Chronic Pain: Targeting Central Sensitization, Dr. Gereau will discuss in detail studies showing that amygdala ERK activation contributes to plasticity underlying central pain sensitization. He will include behavioral, biochemical, electrophysiological, and optogenetic approaches to dissect the role amygdala plasticity in central sensitization underlying chronic pain. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Feb 2, 2012
5:30pm
What Therapeutic Drugs Do, Where They Go, and What They Are Good For - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
John Scott, PhD Edwin G. Krebs - Hilma Speights Professor of Cell Signaling and Cancer Biology Department of Pharmacology University of Washington School of Medicine Seattle, Washington A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Dr. Scott will deliver a lecture on how therapeutic drugs select their targets in different regions of the cell and how pharmacological interventions can be used to control age- and lifestyle-related ailments, such as diabetes, heart disease, and cataracts. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Feb 3, 2012
1:00pm
Cell Signaling in Space and Time - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
John Scott, PhD Edwin G. Krebs - Hilma Speights Professor of Cell Signaling and Cancer Biology Department of Pharmacology University of Washington School of Medicine Seattle, Washington A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Intracellular signal transduction events are precisely regulated in space and time. This is achieved in part by A-kinase anchoring proteins, or AKAPs, that tether signaling enzymes such as protein kinases and phosphatases in proximity to selected substrates. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Feb 9, 2012
5:30pm
How Does a Frog Egg Solve Geometry Problems? - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Timothy J. Mitchison, PhD Hasib Sabbagh Professor of Systems Biology Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series One of the big challenges in biology is to understand how cells are physically organized by molecules, which are much smaller than the cell. This challenge is epitomized by frog eggs, which are enormous compared to most cells. After fertilization, frog eggs cleave in the middle, and then cleave again at right angles, on their way to becoming embryos. The question of how these cleavage planes are accurately positioned has interested biologists for 200 years. We have studied this problem using microscopy and biochemistry in frog and fish eggs, and in cell free extracts made from frog eggs. The answers lie in the behavior of starburst-like arrays of microtubules called asters, and in how they grow and interact inside the egg. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Feb 10, 2012
1:00pm
How Does Paclitaxel Work as a Cancer Medicine? - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Timothy J. Mitchison, PhD Hasib Sabbagh Professor of Systems Biology Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Paclitaxel is an important anti-cancer drug that stabilizes microtubules, causing dividing cancer cells to arrest in mitosis and eventually die. If we could understand the principles by which this effective, but toxic, drug acts, we might be able to design better future drugs. Paclitaxel and other cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs are thought to gain their selectivity from tumor cells proliferating faster than normal cells, yet the reality is that most human tumors grow slowly, with infrequent divisions. Using intravital imaging to visualize dividing cells in living mice, Dr. Mitchison and his colleagues have been comparing how paclitaxel kills cancer cells in tissue culture and model mouse tumors. They have found that the mitotic death mechanism seen in culture does occur in a subset of tumor cells, but it is not sufficient to explain the overall tumor response. The scientists are investigating how paclitaxel may cause a change in the tumor environment to promote regression. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Feb 23, 2012
5:30pm
Behavioral Choice Theory and Obesity - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Leonard Epstein, PhD Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics and Social and Preventive Medicine University of Buffalo Buffalo, New York A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Obesity involves a series of choices that involve consuming too many calories and not getting enough exercise. Behavioral choice theory is designed to understand choice processes, and a substantial research base has developed to use behavioral choice theory to prevent and treat obesity. Dr. Leonard Epstein will present examples from this work, including research to prevent and treat obesity. He will also discuss the use of price manipulations to improve food consumption. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Feb 24, 2012
11:15am
Computer Science Distinguished Lecture - Code as a Metaphor for Computational Thinking by Owen Astrachan - Seminar/Conference (2150 Torgersen)
From an educational standpoint Computer Science has embraced the phrase 'Computational Thinking' as part of defining what our students should do. The National Academies and the National Research Council call for standards based on Computational Thinking. The National Science Foundation has required that Computational Thinking be addressed in many grants and programs. What is Computational Thinking? It may be that we cannot define it precisely, but just as Supreme Court Justice Potter Steward said of pornography we "know it when we see it". In this talk I will use code as a metaphor for explaining efforts to make sure that computational thinking is infusing education in K-12, colleges, and universities. I will talk about the code of software and the code of law-and-protocols and how they can be viewed and used together in courses, programs, and projects both at local and national levels. I will explain using concrete examples and stories why this metaphor can be empowering both to us and to our students. BIO: Owen Astrachan is the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Computer Science and Professor of the Practice at Duke where he has taught for more than twenty years. He taught mathematics and computer science in high school for seven years and earned an AB in mathematics from Dartmouth and MAT, MS, and PhD degrees from Duke. Professor Astrachan builds curricula and approaches to teaching computer science. This includes an NSF-sponsored, apprentice-learning approach between Duke, Appalachian State, and North Carolina Central and an NSF CAREER Award to incorporate Design Patterns in courses. He was involved early in AP Computer Science: as teacher, as member of the development committee, and as the Chief Reader. He is the PI on the CS Principles project to create a broader, more accessible AP course in computer science. In 1995 he received Duke's Robert B. Cox Distingished Teaching in Science Award, in 1998 he received the Outstanding Instructor Award while on sabbatical at the University of British Columbia, in 2002 he received Duke's Richard K. Lublin award for "ability to engender genuine intellectual excitement, ability to engender curiosity, knowledge of field and ability to communicate that knowledge", and in 2007 he was an inaugural recipient of the NSF/CISE Distinguished Education Fellow award.
Fri, Feb 24, 2012
1:00pm
Food Reinforcement - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Leonard Epstein, PhD Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics and Social and Preventive Medicine University of Buffalo Buffalo, New York A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series The motivation to eat is a primary cause of obesity. Dr. Leonard Epstein will review research on food reinforcement, including genetic, laboratory, clinical, and field studies. He will also discuss factors that influence food reinforcing, including the interactions between food research and impulsive behaviors. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 8, 2012
5:30pm
The Violent Brain: Ethical and Legal Implications - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Adrian Raine, DPhil Richard Perry University Professor in the Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology Chair of the Department of Criminology University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pennsylvania A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series In this lecture, Dr. Raine will provide an update of what we know about the biological and brain risk factors that predispose people to violence. He will discuss how these risk factors may be ultimately treated, and he will explore the ethical and legal implications of this research for society in general. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Mar 9, 2012
1:00pm
The Functional Neuroanatomy of Violence - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Adrian Raine, DPhil Richard Perry University Professor in the Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology Chair of the Department of Criminology University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pennsylvania A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series In this seminar, Dr. Raine will provide an overview of the functional neuroanatomy of antisocial and violent behavior. He will explore what we know about structural and functional brain abnormalities in antisocial violent and psychopathic individuals, and he will describe the functional significance of these neurobiological abnormalities. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 15, 2012
5:30pm
The Functional Architecture of Face Processing in the Primate Brain - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Leslie Ungerleider, PhD Chief of the Laboratory of Brain and Cognition National Institute of Mental Health Bethesda, Maryland A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Face recognition is a remarkable ability, given the tens of thousands of different faces we can recognize, sometimes even many years after a single encounter. Because of this unique ability, it has been proposed that there may exist specialized neural machinery dedicated to face recognition, as compared to the recognition of non-face objects. Dr. Ungerleider will discuss recent brain imaging studies exploring the functional architecture of face processing in the primate brain. She will focus on the network dynamics mediating the discrimination and recognition of both facial identity and facial expression. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Mar 16, 2012
1:00pm
Mechanisms for Perceptual Decision-Making in the Human Brain - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Leslie Ungerleider, PhD Chief of the Laboratory of Brain and Cognition National Institute of Mental Health Bethesda, Maryland A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Findings from single-cell recording studies suggest that a comparison of the outputs of different pools of selectively tuned lower-level sensory neurons may be a general mechanism by which higher-level cortical regions compute perceptual decisions. For example, when monkeys must decide whether a noisy field of dots is moving upward or downward, a decision can be formed by computing the difference in responses between lower-level neurons sensitive to upward motion and those sensitive to downward motion. Dr. Ungerleider will present evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging that even for high-level object categories, the comparison of the outputs of different pools of selectively tuned neurons could be a general mechanism by which the human brain computes perceptual decisions. She will also argue that the posterior dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in humans has general decision-making functions, independent of stimulus and response modalities, thereby providing a flexible link between sensory evidence, decision, and action. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 22, 2012
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Tom Ridge, former governor of Pennsylvania and the first secretary of the Department of Homeland Security: "Leadership in Times of Crisis."
Thu, Mar 29, 2012
5:30pm
Back to the Future: Brain Stimulation in Psychiatry - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Sarah Lisanby, MD Chair Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke University School of Medicine Durham, North Carolina A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series An expert in translational research in the field of brain stimulation, Dr. Sarah Lisanby has been recognized for her leading role in pioneering a novel depression treatment called magnetic seizure therapy, which her team took through the steps from bench to bedside and is now in multicenter, international collaborative trials. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Mar 30, 2012
11:15am
Distinguished Lecture in Computer Science - Paul Dourish, UC Irvine - Towards a Materiality of Information - Seminar/Conference (2150 Torgersen Hall)
In this talk, I'd like to sketch some very preliminary ideas that I'm beginning to shape into a research program for the next few years. They revolve around the materiality of digital information. In the humanities and social sciences, the last few years have seen a rise in interest in "materiality" -- an examination of the nature and consequences of the material forms of objects of social and cultural import. There are many different things that one might mean when talking of the materiality of digital information -- everything from why iPods have a different cultural cache than Zunes (the domain of material culture) to how urban landscapes are reshaped by the material constraints of high-capacity network wiring or wireless access patterns (the domain of human geography). At the moment, my particular interest is in the consequences of the fact that information -- which we generally talk about as if it were ineffable and abstract -- is something that we encounter only ever in material form, and that our information practices (the things we know how to do, as information scientists) are inextricably entwined with these material forms, both substrates (media) and representations (conventional patterns).
Fri, Mar 30, 2012
1:00pm
Translational Development of Noninvasive Brain Stimulation Treatments for Depression - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Drive, Roanoke)
Sarah Lisanby, MD Chair Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke University School of Medicine Durham, North Carolina A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series An expert in translational research in the field of brain stimulation, Dr. Sarah Lisanby has been recognized for her leading role in pioneering a novel depression treatment called magnetic seizure therapy, which her team took through the steps from bench to bedside and is now in multicenter, international collaborative trials. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Mar 30, 2012
3:00pm
Uranium from Africa and the Power of Nuclear Things. Prof. Gabrielle Hecht, University of Michigan. 23rd Annual Nicholas Mullins Lecture - Special Event (2150 Torgersen Hall)
Please join us for the 23rd Annual Nicholas Mullins Lecture of the Department of Science and Technology in Society. Our distinguished guest will be Gabrielle Hecht, Professor of History at the University of Michigan. Dr. Hecht's talk, "Uranium from Africa and the Power of Nuclear Things" is drawn from her new book on the global uranium trade, which was just released on March 9: "Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade" (MIT Press and Wits University Press, 2012). Abstract: We hear much today about a "second nuclear age" fraught with uncertainty. Like other master categories that claim global purview, the "nuclear" inscribes and enacts politics of inclusion and exclusion. These politics are especially clear from the vantage of African uranium mines during the era of decolonization and Cold War. African ore supplied 20-50% of the West's uranium, shaping global meanings of the "nuclear", with consequences for the circulation of radioactive materials, the institutions and treaties governing atomic energy, and the lives and health of mineworkers. From Niger, to Gabon, and Namibia, this talk explores the manifestations and consequences of nuclearity. Biosketch: Gabrielle Hecht is Professor of History at the University of Michigan. Her book "The Radiance of France: Nuclear Power and National Identity after World War II" (MIT Press, new edition 2009) received the AHA's Henry Baxter Adams award and the Edelstein prize from the Society for the History of Technology. She recently edited "Entangled Geographies: Empire and Technopolitics in the Global Cold War" (MIT Press, 2011). Her new monograph, "Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade" (MIT Press and Wits University Press, 2012) examines the colonial, transnational, and postcolonial history of uranium production, focusing especially on matters of trade, labor, and occupational health. Drawing on archival and ethnographic research in Africa, Europe, and North America, the book seeks to remake understandings of the nuclear age by looking at Africa in the nuclear world, and the nuclear world in Africa.
Mon, Apr 2, 2012
7:00pm
Randy Roberts, "Popular Culture Goes to War: John Wayne, Joe Louis, Superman, and American Culture During World War II" - Special Event (3100 Torgerson Hall)
Please join us for a lecture by Dr. Randy Roberts, Distinguished Professor of History at Purdue University. This special event is sponsored by Phi Alpha Theta (the History Honor Society) and the History Club at Virginia Tech.
Tue, Apr 3, 2012
3:30pm
Wells Fargo Distinguished Speaker Series - Special Event (Alumni Assembly Hall )
Jeanette Hubbard, VP Altria
Fri, Apr 6, 2012
4:00pm
Inaugural G.V. Loganathan Distinguished Lecture--Dr. Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy - Seminar/Conference (Owens Hall Banquet Room)
Dr. Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Florida, is the inaugural speaker in this series. The title of his lecture will be, "Opportunities for Reinventing Urban Water Management in Cities of the Future."
Tue, Apr 17, 2012
12:00pm
Roundtable Discussion on "Struggling for Peace: The Women of Northern Ireland" - Seminar/Conference (Conference Room A, International Affairs Offices (526 Prices Fork Road))
Avila Kilmurray has a distinguished international career in areas related to social justice work. Previously she was coordinator of the Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action's Rural Action Project, a European Union Second Anti-Poverty Program initiative. In 1990 she was appointed the first Women's Officer for the Ireland Transport and General Workers' Union. Ms. Kilmurray was also active in establishing the Northern Ireland Women's Coalition. She currently sits on the board of the Global Fund for Community Foundations, which supports community building throughout the developing world. The Community Foundation of Northern Ireland is an independent charitable grant-making organization, whose mission is to "drive social change." Ms. Kilmurray has served as the director for eighteen years and has a particular interest in community development, peacebuilding, and women's issues. The Women in International Development (WID) program has sponsored a discussion series for the past several years, giving students and professionals an opportunity to share their research and discuss ideas of women in international development. Students, faculty, staff, and members of the community are encouraged to attend the discussions and bring their ideas and questions. For the complete discussion series schedule for Spring 2012, see: http://www.oired.vt.edu/WID/events.html. Feel free to bring your lunch and encourage others to attend. We look forward to seeing you there!
Wed, Apr 25, 2012
6:30pm
Lecture on the Chemistry of Beer and Wine - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (The Greene Turtle, 900 N. Glebe Road, Arlington, VA 22203)
Jim Wightman, Virginia Tech Alumni Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Chemistry, will give a talk on "Beer and Wine -- The Forgotten Chemistry."
Thu, May 3, 2012
4:00pm
NCR Faculty Association 2012 Distinguished Lecture - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (Virginia Tech Research Center, 900 N. Glebe Road, 2nd Floor, Arlington, VA)
James Bohland, professor emeritus and retired vice president and executive director of National Capital Region Operations will give a lecture on "Public Research Universities in the 21st Century: Challenges, Conflicts, and Paradoxes."
Thu, May 10, 2012
5:30pm
Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Amy Wagers, PhD Associate Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Stem cells are the building blocks of the body's tissues and hold tremendous promise for the treatment of degenerative disease. This lecture will discuss the basic properties of stem cells that make them attractive for therapy and the possible avenues through which stem cell research may lead to improved medical treatments. Lessons will be drawn from a number of tissue systems, including the skeletal muscle and hematopoietic systems. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, May 11, 2012
1:00pm
Reversing Stem Cell Dysfunction in Aging and Disease - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Amy Wagers, PhD Associate Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts A research seminar in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series Stem cells are essential for tissue maintenance and repair after injury. Yet organismal aging leads to a loss of stem cell regenerative potential that ultimately translates into a failure to maintain tissue homeostasis. Similarly, disruption of the normal balance between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation can lead to malignant transformation. This lecture will focus on strategies to intervene in these disease processes through an understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic signals that control stem cell fate. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, May 24, 2012
5:30pm
How the Brain Develops the Ability to Integrate Information from Different Senses - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Barry Stein, PhD Professor and Chairman, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy Professor of Neurology Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, North Carolina A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Visiting Scholars Series A remarkable feature of the brain is its ability to synthesize information from different senses to create a singular percept of the external world. This process of multisensory integration takes place at many loci, but has been best studied in the cat superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain structure involved in orientation/localization behavior. Yet its underlying principles appear to be species independent. SC neurons integrate information from various combinations of visual, auditory, and tactile inputs, a process that dramatically alters their responses and the behaviors that depend on them. The acquisition of multisensory integration capability and the crafting of its operational principles are processes that develop early in life and that depend heavily on at least two interrelated factors: a dialogue between SC neurons and their descending inputs from the association areas of the cerebral cortex, and experience with the statistics of cross-modal events. These factors help develop the neural circuitry underlying multisensory integration, and adapt its operational principles to the environment in which it will be used. They may also make it possible to modify these principles later in life if environmental circumstances change. A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Sep 13, 2012
2:00pm
Roy E. Blaser: A Legacy of Dynamic Discontent - Seminar/Conference (Fralin Auditorium)
The Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences announces the first Roy E. Blaser Distinguished Lecture by Dr. Vivien Allen of Texas Tech University. Dr. Allen was professor of agronomy at Virginia Tech from 1980-95 and was the Paul Whitfield Horn Professor and Thornton Distinguished Professor of Forages at Texas Tech University from 1995-2011. She is fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and was president of the Crop Science Society of America in 2002. A reception will follow.
Thu, Sep 13, 2012
2:00pm
Roy E. Blaser: A Legacy of Dynamic Discontent - Seminar/Conference (Fralin Aditorium)
The Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, announces the first Roy E. Blaser Distinguished Lecture by Dr. Vivien Allen of Texas Tech University. Dr. Allen was professor of agronomy at Virginia Tech from 1980-95 and was the Paul Whitfield Horn Professor and Thornton Distinguished Professor of Forages at Texas Tech University from 1995-2011. She is fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and was president of the Crop Science Society of America in 2002. A reception following the lecture at 4:30 p.m. in the Cascades Room at the Inn at Virginia Tech. Please RSVP to: Judy Keister.
Tue, Sep 18, 2012
10:30am
ICCAE Speaker Series: SPYCRAFT, The Secret History of the CIA's Spytechs from Communism to al-Qaeda - Seminar/Conference (ICTAS 310)
A recipient of the Intelligence Medal of Merit and the Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal, Bob Wallace's 32-year career with the Central Intelligence Agency included assignments as an operations officer, station chief, resource manager and director of clandestine technical programs. He is the co-author of SPYCRAFT, The Secret History of the CIA's Spytechs from Communism to al-Qaeda and The Official CIA Manual of Deception and Trickery.
Tue, Sep 25, 2012
2:30pm
Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (Fralin Auditorium)
Dr. Peter Tyler will give a presentation entitled "Synthesis of a Targeted Library of Heparan Sulfate Saccharides that Inhibit the Alzheimer's B-Secretase." Dr. Peter Tyler received the ranking of Distinguished Scientist in recognition of his design and synthesis of new biologically active carbohydrate molecules, including the discovery of compounds that block T-cell proliferation (a discovery that subsequently brought in more than $6 million in royalty payments to IRL), a new anti-cancer compound that alters important gene expression in tumour cells, and a potential new type of anti-bacterial control that works by blocking bacterial quorum sensing. Peter, who is Programme Leader of the Glycotherapeutics and New Synthetic Methods programmes at IRL, is one of five Science Team Leaders within the Carbohydrate Chemistry group, led by Dr Richard Furneaux. Peter is a dedicated bench chemist and an essential part of the duo that began the Carbohydrate Chemistry group in 1985.
Thu, Oct 11, 2012
3:00pm
Personal Statement Workshop for Pre-Health Students - Academic (TBD; registered students will receive an e-mail)
Writing a personal statement for admission to a medical or health professional school can be time consuming and challenging. Join Dr. George Simmons, Alumni Distinguished Professor Emeritus, VT Biological Sciences, when he and staff from the Writing Center present the DOs and DON'Ts of writing a personal statement.
Mon, Oct 15, 2012
5:30pm
Open research advocate Cameron Neylon - Academic (Graduate Life Center Auditorium)
Cameron Neylon, biophysicist and open research advocate, presents Network Enabled Research: the Challenge for Institutions. Neylon is the Advocacy Director at the Public Library of Science and is interested in how to make the internet more effective as a tool for science. He writes and speaks regularly on scholarly communication, the design of web-based tools for research and the need for policy and cultural change within and around the research community. Neylon is the Fall 2012 Virginia Tech Distinguished Innovator in Residence.
Tue, Oct 16, 2012
7:00pm
Virginia Tech honors Toni Morrison - Special Event (Burruss Hall Auditorium)
"Sheer Good Fortune: Celebrating Toni Morrison," will bring Toni Morrison, American novelist, editor, and professor to the Virginia Tech campus, where she will be celebrated by guests spanning the fields of literature, music, government, and more. Hosts for the evening are Maya Angelou, author and poet; Nikki Giovanni, Virginia Tech University Distinguished Professor, poet, writer, commentator, and activist; and JoAnne Gabbin, professor of English and executive director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center at James Madison University. The event is free but tickets are required and limited to 2 per person. Tickets will be available beginning September 10. For more information about tickets, visit http://www.studentcenters.vt.edu/tickets/events.php This event is presented by the Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech and sponsored by the Office of the President, College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, and University Development at Virginia Tech.
Fri, Oct 19, 2012
1:30pm
STEM is a Hot Topic - But Are We Making a Difference? - Special Event (Fralin Biotechnology Auditorium)
Dr. Mary Guy Miller of IDD, Inc. is the 2012 Glover and Frances Trent Distinguished Scholar. She will present this year's lecture entitled "STEM is a Hot Topic - But Are We Making a Difference?" on October 19, 2012 at the Fralin Biotechnology Auditorium at 1:30 PM. Dr Miller will share her personal reflections on a 40 year career in the STEM environment - from a classroom teacher to the owner of an IT company. She shares her excitement for the future impact of technology on every aspect of society and shares her views on how we must offer everyone a chance to be a part of the opportunity. Reception immediately following lecture in the atrium.
Fri, Oct 19, 2012
1:30pm
The Glover and Frances Trent Distinguished Scholar Lecture - Special Event (Fralin Biotechnology Auditorium)
Dr. Mary Guy Miller is the 2012 Glover and Frances Trent Distinguished Scholar. She will share her reflections on her 40-year career in the STEM environment in her presentation, "Stem is a Hot Topic - But Are We Making a Difference?" She will talk about her transition from classroom teacher to president and founder of IDD, a successful IT firm which began as a spin-off from Virginia Tech. Dr. Miller is excited about the future impact of technology on all aspects of society and shares her views on the importance of preparing everyone for the chance to be part of great opportunities.
Mon, Oct 22, 2012
4:00pm
Personal Statement Workshop for Pre-Health Students - Academic (TBD; registered students will receive an e-mail)
Writing a personal statement for admission to a medical or health professional school can be time consuming and challenging. Join Dr. George Simmons, Alumni Distinguished Professor Emeritus, VT Biological Sciences, when he and staff from the Writing Center present the DOs and DON'Ts of writing a personal statement.
Mon, Oct 29, 2012
4:00pm
Challenges and Opportunities in Water Resources Research and Education - Seminar/Conference (Alumni Hall Auditorium, The Inn at Virginia Tech)
George M. Hornberger, Distinguished Professor, Vanderbilt University The recent NRC report "Challenges and Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences" noted that research and education in water resources will be different in the future than today primarily because humans have become such a dominant part of the water cycle. This observation leads to several conclusions. In addition to important work in the many disciplinary areas that are part of water resources science and engineering, there is a need for interdisciplinary research that takes advantage of cutting edge technologies to grapple with the complex water related challenges of today and tomorrow. To solve today's complex water problems, scientists, engineers, and water managers need disciplinary depth and intellectual breadth to bridge disciplines and the ability to communicate science to policy makers effectively. Multi-way interactions among scientists, engineers, water managers, and decision makers (termed "translational hydrologic science" in the NRC report) are needed to connect science and decision making more closely in order to address increasingly urgent water policy issues. I will discuss research and education challenges associated with these issues, in part using Vanderbilt's ongoing work in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh to provide context. I will pay special attention to the role and necessity of integrated, interdisciplinary research. Reception to follow: 5:00-6:00 pm, Latham Ballroom
Sun, Nov 4, 2012
3:00pm
Brooks de Wetter-Smith, flute (guest artist recital) - Music/Theatre/Dance (Squires Recital Salon)
Flutist Brooks de Wetter-Smith performs a guest artist recital assisted by Dr Tracy Cowden, piano and Elizabeth Crone, flute. The program will feature works by Gaubert, Schoenfield, Schocker and Franck. Brooks de Wetter-Smith, the James Gordon Hanes Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina, is in great demand as a recitalist, concerto soloist and masterclass teacher, having performed in 20 nations (Eastern- and Western Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and South America) and nearly all 50 states. His recordings are available on the Albany, Aurophon, Centaur, Christophorus, Crystal, and Paulinas labels, spanning baroque, romantic, and twentieth-centuries, and jazz-inspired repertoire. Many of his recordings include world premieres and works commissioned by or dedicated to him. His performances have been broadcast live on radio and television, including Radio Bremen, Bavarian Radio, Salzburg Radio, Radio/Television Hong Kong, and PBS affiliates in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California and Nebraska.
Mon, Nov 12, 2012
5:30pm
The Brain and the Law - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
David Eagleman, PhD Assistant Professor of Neuroscience Director, Laboratory for Perception and Action Director, Initiative on Neuroscience and Law Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Texas A public lecture in the distinguished-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Emerging questions at the interface of law and neuroscience challenge notions at the heart of our criminal justice system. Are all brains really created equal? Is mass incarceration the most fruitful method to deal with juveniles, people with mental illness, and those addicted to drugs? Can novel technologies such as real-time brain imaging be leveraged for new methods of rehabilitation? Dr. Eagleman will discuss these issues and others, such as why the legal system will eventually be forced to shift its emphasis from blameworthiness to a forward-thinking analysis of future behavior. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Mon, Nov 26, 2012
4:00pm
Challenges and opportunites in water resources research and education - Seminar/Conference (Alumni Hall Auditorium, VT Inn)
Dr. George Hornberger, Distinguished University Professor at Vanderbilt University, will be presenting a seminar on "Challenges and Opportunities in Water Resources Research and Education." It will be presented on Monday, Nov. 26, starting at 4pm at Alumni Hall Auditorium at the VT Inn. A reception will following in Latham Ballroom B at the VT Inn. The seminar is sponsored by ICTAS, CNRE, and VWRRC.
Thu, Dec 6, 2012
5:30pm
Personalized Cancer Medicine: Are We There Yet? - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Eileen Dolan, PhD Professor of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology Co-Director, Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics Program of the Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Chicago, Illinois A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series A primary aim of pharmacogenomics is to devise personalized treatment strategies based on an individual's genetic makeup to maximize the potential for therapeutic benefit and minimize the risk of adverse side effects. Dr. Dolan will discuss the role of pharmacogenomics in cancer research, a field in which personalized drug therapy is especially desirable given the narrow therapeutic index and life-threatening consequences of drug toxicity. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 10, 2013
5:30pm
The Power of Singing: Implications for Brain Plasticity and Recovery of Function - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Gottfried Schlaug, MD, PhD Director, Music and Neuroimaging Laboratory Director, Stroke Recovery Laboratory Chief, Division of Cerebrovascular Disorders Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Associate Professor of Neurology Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Each year tens of thousands of people in the United States suffer from aphasia, a devastating complication of stroke that causes severe communication difficulties. One of the few accepted treatments for severe non-fluent aphasic patients is melodic intonation therapy, a technique inspired by the clinical observation that some severely aphasic people can sing lyrics better than they can speak the same words. Dr. Schlaug will present research on melodic intonation therapy and discuss its implications for understanding plasticity in the human brain. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 17, 2013
11:00am
Denial of Service Attacks: Network Hyperexcitability in Alzheimer's Dementia [NOTE TIME CHANGE] - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Jeffrey Noebels, MD, PhD Professor of Neurology, of Neuroscience, and of Human Genetics Cullen Trust for Health Care Endowed Chair Director of the Blue Bird Circle Developmental Neurogenetics Laboratory Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Texas A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series In this seminar, Dr. Noebels will discuss new evidence linking genes for Alzheimer's dementia with abnormal cortical oscillations and clinically silent seizures in the temporal lobe. He will also examine the importance of recognizing and treating hippocampal network hyperexcitability to preserve cognitive function in the aging brain. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Sun, Feb 3, 2013
3:00pm
An afternoon with the Brahms Sextets - Music/Theatre/Dance (Squires recital Salon)
Musica Viva! presents an afternoon of chamber music featuring Four distinguished guests, chamber music specialists, that will join David Ehrlich and Benjamin Wyatt, members of our local group, the Avanti Ensemble. This afternoon will offer a performance of Two of the most beloved works in the whole chamber music literature: The Brahms sextets. The guests are Violinist Janet Orenstein, Violists Amadi Azikiwe and Milena Pajaro van de Stadt, and cellist Michael Kannen. The sextets are very engaging, dramatic and lyrical at same time.
Mon, Feb 4, 2013
1:30pm
Redefining Greece by Restoring its Credibility - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (7054 Haycock Road, Falls Church, VA 22043)
An open discussion on confronting international misconceptions and moving forward through collective civil society initiatives and a presentation and dialogue for action open to the public. Special guest: Alexandros Costopoulos, founder of the Repower Greece campaign and the Repower Greece Team. Costopoulos is a communications strategist active in the fields of strategic affairs and transatlantic economic relations. As founder and CEO of FORESIGHT Strategy and Communications, he has collaborated with distinguished individuals and prominent organizations from the political, academic, and business sectors in the United States, Greece, and the broader southeast Europen region to provide communication strategies related to public affairs, reputation management, public diplomacy, and civil society engagement. Costopoulos is an elected member of the Board of Directors of the American-Hellenic Chamber of Commerce, director for Greece of American Citizens Abroad and cofounder of the Insittute for Regional Dialogue and Strategy. He has written for various newspapers and magazines in Greece and has published two books: "Bridges of Cooperation--Marshall Plan and Greece," and "Bridges of Liberty-American Philhellenism in the 18th and 19th Centuries."
Tue, Feb 5, 2013
3:30pm
Wells Fargo Distinguished Speaker Series - Michael Aldrich - Special Event (Alumni Assembly Hall)
Michael Aldrich, Head, Brown Advisory Wells Fargo Distinguished Speaker Series
Thu, Feb 14, 2013
5:30pm
Exciting New Ways to Stimulate the Brain to Treat Depression or Pain - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Mark George, MD Distinguished University Professor of Psychiatry Director, Brain Stimulation Laboratory Director, Brain Imaging Center of Excellence Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, South Carolina A public lecture in the distinguished-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Functional imaging research over the past 20 years has outlined the brain's cellular networks involved in regulating mood and processing pain. It is now possible to test whether stimulating different parts of these cellular networks can provide therapeutic treatment of depression and pain. In his presentation, Dr. George will consider noninvasive methods for stimulating the brain, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. He will also critically compare the various approaches with respect to the best available evidence. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 7, 2013
2:00pm
The Labile Brain: Neuroplasticity Across the Lifespan - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
"The Labile Brain: Neuroplasticity Across the Lifespan," held March 7-8, is the 25th Annual Symposium of the Central Virginia Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience. This year's program, co-sponsored by the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, will include a series of talks on the plasticity of the nervous system at the intracellular, intercellular, and neuroanatomical levels. Speakers will explore how changes in the brain affect the organization of the nervous system and the consequent adaptive and maladaptive behaviors. Three keynote speakers will be featured. Darwin Berg, PhD, distinguished professor and chair of neurobiology at the University of California, San Diego, will speak on "Nicotinic Control of Neural Nets"; Marina Wolf, PhD, professor and chair of neuroscience at Chicago Medical School, will speak on "Plasticity of Group I mGluR-AMPAR Interactions in the Nucleus Accumbens During Cocaine Withdrawal: Basis for Anti-Craving Drugs?"; and Alvaro Pascual-Leone, MD, PhD, professor in neurology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will speak on "Characterizing and Guiding Human Brain Plasticity and Network Dynamics." Advanced registration is due by March 1. The cost of attending is $85 for faculty members; $50 for postdoctoral fellows, residents, and technicians; and $20 for undergraduate and graduate students. After March 1, the registration fee will increase by $10. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 7, 2013
3:30pm
Wells Fargo Distinguished Speaker Series-Maria Anderson - Special Event (Alumni Assembly Hall)
CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER: Maria Anderson, Campus Development Manager, KPMG Wells Fargo Distinguished Speaker Series
Fri, Mar 8, 2013
9:00am
The Labile Brain: Neuroplasticity Across the Lifespan - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
"The Labile Brain: Neuroplasticity Across the Lifespan," held March 7-8, is the 25th Annual Symposium of the Central Virginia Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience. This year's program, co-sponsored by the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, will include a series of talks on the plasticity of the nervous system at the intracellular, intercellular, and neuroanatomical levels. Speakers will explore how changes in the brain affect the organization of the nervous system and the consequent adaptive and maladaptive behaviors. Three keynote speakers will be featured. Darwin Berg, PhD, distinguished professor and chair of neurobiology at the University of California, San Diego, will speak on "Nicotinic Control of Neural Nets"; Marina Wolf, PhD, professor and chair of neuroscience at Chicago Medical School, will speak on "Plasticity of Group I mGluR-AMPAR Interactions in the Nucleus Accumbens During Cocaine Withdrawal: Basis for Anti-Craving Drugs?"; and Alvaro Pascual-Leone, MD, PhD, professor in neurology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will speak on "Characterizing and Guiding Human Brain Plasticity and Network Dynamics." Advanced registration is due by March 1. The cost of attending is $85 for faculty members; $50 for postdoctoral fellows, residents, and technicians; and $20 for undergraduate and graduate students. After March 1, the registration fee will increase by $10. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 14, 2013
7:00pm
Brain School: How Brains Grow and Age - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute)
A public event part of Brain Awareness Week The Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute is offering Brain School, a four-part seminar series that offers an owner's manual on the brain. Dr. Ramey will discuss how the brain of a baby morphs into a mature adult brain. She will consider the dramatic changes in the structure, size, and complexity of the brain that occur throughout in utero and during postnatal development and how genes and life's experiences affect the brain's maturation and function. Dr. Friedlander will discuss the processes that occur during normal brain aging, including the metabolism and activity in the brain, changes in the nature and number of nerve cells, and the genesis of new nerve cells. He will also compare healthy brain aging with Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Valdez will discuss how exercise and diet help slow the mental and physical erosion that occurs with aging. A primary focus of his presentation will be the effect of such lifestyles on synapses. Examples from humans and animals will be used to demonstrate how various brain and peripheral areas, including skeletal muscles, change through the different stages of life. Speakers: Sharon Ramey, PhD, Professor and Distinguished Research Scholar; Michael Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director; and Gregorio Valdez, Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 21, 2013
3:30pm
Wells Fargo Distinguished Speaker Series-Susan Bari - Special Event (Alumni Assembly Hall)
Susan Bari, Prudential Douglas Elliman Real Estate Wells Fargo Distinguished Speaker Series
Fri, Mar 22, 2013
3:00pm
John E. Peterson, Jr. Distinguished Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (3001 Pamplin Hall)
The Effects of Regulation, Standard Setting and Auditor Sanctioning on Managers' use of Voluntary Accounting Changes By Timothy M. Keune, University of South Carolina
Thu, Mar 28, 2013
5:30pm
The Systems Biology Challenge: Mission Impossible? - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Peter Kohl, MD, PhD Professor and Chair of Cardiac Biophysics and Systems Biology National Heart and Lung Institute Imperial College London Visiting Professor Department of Computer Science University of Oxford A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series What is systems biology? How does it differ from classic biomedical research? Do we need it? What is the role of computer models in this context? Can they be relied on? Can computer simulations replace experiments on living animals? When will we have an all-inclusive model of a patient? These and other questions are often raised in the context of post-genomic research. Dr. Kohl will present a personal and - as he admits - likely biased view on the Systems Biology Challenge. He will illustrate his views using examples from heart research conducted by his team and collaborators and finish with a Praise of Failure (students: take note!). Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 28, 2013
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Former New Jersey governor Christine Todd Whitman
Fri, Apr 5, 2013
16th Annual Brian Bertoti Conference on Innovative Perspectives in History - Special Event (University Club and Graduate Life Center)
The Department of History and the History Graduate Student Association present the 16th Annual Brian Bertoti Graduate Conference on Innovative Perspectives in History. Friday, April 5: Keynote Address by Dr. Monica Black, UT Knoxville, "German Miracles: Faith, Healing, and the Problem of Evil after Nazism." 6:30 - 8:00 pm., University Club Registration begins at 5:00 PM at the University Club. Saturday April 6, 8:00 am to 5:30 pm. Registration begins at 8:00 am in the Graduate Life Center. Lunch Speaker is Dr. Brian Simon (OAH Distinguished Lecturer), Temple University, "Learning about America from Starbucks" 1:00 -2:00 pm., Graduate Life Center For a full schedule of the sessions, visit the Bertoti Conference Website: http://www.history.vt.edu/hgsa_website/bertoti/
Fri, Apr 5, 2013
4:00pm
G.V. Loganathan Distinguished Lecture, "The Use and Misuse of Mathematical Models in Water Resources Engineering" - Special Event (Banquet Room, Owens Hall)
Dr. Lindell Ormsbee is an international expert on water distribution system modeling and security. He also has expertise in the flowing areas: operations research, systems analysis, evolutionary computing, neural network analysis, mathematical modeling of physical and biological systems, watershed and groundwater modeling, groundwater remediation, watershed and storm water management--including TMDL development, research translation, and effective strategies for public engagement in environmental issues. Dr. Ormsbee is the Raymond-Blythe Professor of civil engineering at the University of Kentucky. He currently serves as the director of the Kentucky Water Research Institute, the Kentucky Center of Excellence for Watershed Management as well as the associate director of the UK Superfund Research Program. Dr. Ormsbee's current research efforts are directed toward the application of systems analysis methods to complex problems in water resources and environmental systems. Over the last 30 years, his research program has helped generate over $50 million in external contracts from various agencies including the National Science Foundation, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Homeland Security. Reception to follow
Sat, Apr 6, 2013
16th Annual Brian Bertoti Conference on Innovative Perspectives in History - Special Event (University Club and Graduate Life Center)
The Department of History and the History Graduate Student Association present the 16th Annual Brian Bertoti Graduate Conference on Innovative Perspectives in History. Friday, April 5: Keynote Address by Dr. Monica Black, UT Knoxville, "German Miracles: Faith, Healing, and the Problem of Evil after Nazism." 6:30 - 8:00 pm., University Club Registration begins at 5:00 PM at the University Club. Saturday April 6, 8:00 am to 5:30 pm. Registration begins at 8:00 am in the Graduate Life Center. Lunch Speaker is Dr. Brian Simon (OAH Distinguished Lecturer), Temple University, "Learning about America from Starbucks" 1:00 -2:00 pm., Graduate Life Center For a full schedule of the sessions, visit the Bertoti Conference Website: http://www.history.vt.edu/hgsa_website/bertoti/
Thu, Apr 11, 2013
5:30pm
Visualizing Molecular Machines and Cells - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Wah Chiu, PhD Alvin Romansky Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Director, National Center for Macromolecular Imaging Director, Center for Protein Folding Machinery Co-Director, W. M. Keck Center for Computational Biology Baylor College of Medicine A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series A virus is a nanoparticle that infects a host cell and replicates itself inside the cell. Dr. Chiu's team visualizes the 3-D structures of virus particles in a cellular environment. Multiple 3-D snapshots of a virus infecting a bacterium uncover a detailed mechanism of viral protein rearrangements to accommodate DNA packaging and release. A structural comparison of bacterial and animal viruses provides a basis for designing a synthetic nanoparticle containing DNA for biotechnology applications. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Apr 12, 2013
3:00pm
John E. Peterson, Jr. Distinguished Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (3001 Pamplin Hall)
Impaired Judgement: The Effects of Asset Impairment Reversibility and Cognitive Dissonance on Future Investment By Nicholas Seybert from University of Maryland - College Park
Thu, Apr 18, 2013
11:00am
TEDMED Live: Going Farther While Staying Closer - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
TEDMED is a multidisciplinary community of innovators and leaders who share a common determination to create a better future in health and medicine. This program features brilliant short talks and stunning artistic performances that celebrate the power of unexpected connections to create important new possibilities. Join the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute on April 16-19 as we live broadcast this year's TEDMED program in our third-floor conference center. Speakers for this session include: Ramesh Raskar Can computational photography change the way we see the future of technology in medicine? Ramesh Raskar of MIT Media Lab will share his insights. Roni Zeiger Hear why internal medicine physician Roni Zeiger left his position as chief health strategist at Google to explore the next generation of social media and health. Susan Desmond-Hellmann Susan Desmond-Hellmann, MD, MPH, became the ninth Chancellor of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in August 2009. An oncologist and renowned biotechnology leader, Desmond-Hellmann holds the Arthur and Toni Rembe Rock Distinguished Professor appointment at UCSF. In her role as Chancellor, she oversees all aspects of the university and medical center's strategy and operations. Christopher J.L. Murray Physician and health economist Christopher Murray is changing the way we measure and visualize global health. Larry Brilliant Larry Brilliant, former director of Google.org, confronts the world's health challenges daily in his job as president and CEO of the Skoll Global Threats Fund. For additional details about the speakers and their topics, visit the TEDMED site.
Fri, Apr 19, 2013
3:00pm
John E. Peterson, Jr. Distinguished Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (3001 Pamplin Hall)
The Influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on Lobbying Effectiveness: Evidence from Effective Tax Rates by Joanna L. Garcia, PhD Candidate, Accounting & Informations Systems, Virginia Tech
Mon, May 6, 2013
6:00pm
Women & Creativity Understanding Gendered Arrangements from a Female Perspective - Seminar/Conference (Hillcrest Dining Hall & Lobby)
Join us for an exhibition and digital presentations on female feticide (aborting a fetus because "it's a girl") by students and faculty. Distinguished speakers: Nikki Giovanni, Poet & Professor Dr. Benjamin Knapp, Professor & Director, (ICAT)
Thu, May 9, 2013
4:00pm
NCR Faculty Association 2013 Distinguished Lecture - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Road, 2nd Floor Ballston Room, Arlington, VA 22203)
James Wolf, professor emeritus, Center for Public Administration and Policy, will lecture on "Learning from Hurricane Sandy: Policy, Administrative and Technical Challenges to Metropolitan Governance." All Virginia Tech faculty, staff, students, and alumni are invited to attend.
Thu, Aug 15, 2013
5:30pm
Engaging the Public in Biomedical Research - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Yvonne Maddox, PhD Deputy Director Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland Member, Institute of Medicine, U.S. National Academy of Sciences A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Yvonne Maddox, PhD, will focus on the importance of biomedical research in improving human health. She will address many of the challenges associated with conducting translational research, and she will cover issues related to the role the public and various communities play in promoting and enhancing participation in clinical studies. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Sep 5, 2013
3:30pm
Wells Fargo Distinguished Speakers Series - Brian Callaghan - Special Event (Alumni Assembly Hall - The Inn at Virginia Tech)
Wells Fargo Distinguished Speakers Series - Brian Callaghan Brian Callaghan is an entrepreneur and investor from Richmond, VA. In 1995, at the age of 24, he borrowed some money from his parents and founded an IT staffing firm named Apex Systems. From that point forward Apex became one of the fastest growing staffing firms in the nation, and by 2012 had grown to become the 6th largest, with over $700mm in revenue. In 2012, Apex was acquired by On Assignment, a publicly traded (NYSE ticker: ASGN) staffing firm specializing in healthcare and IT professions. Brian turned over his title as CEO and joined the Board of On Assignment, on which he serves today.
Mon, Sep 16, 2013
11:00am
Integrated Disaster Risk Management - Special Event (Pamplin Hall, Room 1045)
The Disaster Risk Management Institute at Virginia Tech (DRM@VT) is pleased to announce an invited presentation entitled "Integrated Disaster Risk Management," by Mohsen Ghafory-Ashtiany, Distinguished Professor of Earthquake Engineering and Risk Management, and chairman of SP Insurance Risk Management Institute. Ghafory-Ashtiany, who received his Ph.D. in engineering science and mechanics from Virginia Tech in 1983, is the founder of the International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology and is a pioneer in risk mitigation activities in Iran. He is the author of more than 150 papers, 3 books, and 40 research reports in fields associated with risk analysis, risk management, and risk reduction policy development.
Thu, Sep 26, 2013
5:30pm
Family-Wide Impacts of Genetics: The Case of Fragile X - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Marsha R. Mailick, PhD Director and Vaughan Bascom and Elizabeth M. Boggs Professor Waisman Center University of Wisconsin-Madison A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Mutations in a single gene (FMR1) on the X chromosome are passed from parent to child across multiple generations and eventually become severe enough to result in a range of childhood and adult-onset conditions, including significant intellectual disability, premature menopause, and Parkinson's-like symptoms. Instability in this gene is very common, affecting as many as 1 in 13 women and 1 in 23 men, but only a small proportion have clinical impairments or have been properly diagnosed. This presentation will include an overview of this fascinating but little-known group of conditions and case examples of affected families, and will raise bioethical questions about screening for FMR1 mutations in the general population. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Sep 27, 2013
1:00pm
CBIL Seminar: Modeling and Devices for Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Therapy - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Road, Room 3-024, Arlington VA 22203; IP: 38.68.236.132)
John K-J. Li, is Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University. He is also an adjunct professor of surgery and a graduate faculty member of electrical and computer engineering, physiology, and neuroscience. His presentation will discuss the use of lumped and distributed models of the heart and arterial system with linear and nonlinear parameters with predictive powers for analysis of hypertension in terms of vascular stiffness and pulse wave reflections and myocardial ischemia in terms of contractility and wall motion.
Fri, Sep 27, 2013
4:00pm
Clifford W. Randall Distinguished Lecture - Academic (Hancock Hall )
Dr. David Sedlak will be presenting "The Fourth Revolution in Urban Water Systems": Throughout history, the expansion of cities has required new approaches for managing the urban water cycle. Fundamental changes in the technologies and management of the urban water cycle occur abruptly, as society recognizes that existing technologies are no longer able to achieve the goals of protecting public health and assuring a reliable source of water. Population growth, climate change and changes in investment practices are creating conditions that are conducive to a fourth revolution in urban water systems. By considering recent innovations in water technologies and practices among utilities that are on the forefront of these changes, we can gain insight into the nature of the coming revolution and the research needed to support the transition to more resilient and effective urban water infrastructure.
Fri, Oct 4, 2013
3:00pm
John E. Peterson, Jr. Distinguished Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (Pamplin Hall Room 3001)
Steven Kachelmeier, University of Texas at Austin, "Does Intent Modify Risk-Based Auditing"
Tue, Oct 8, 2013
3:30pm
BB&T Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Latham Ballroom, Inn at Virginia Tech)
Christopher Halmy, Ally Bank
Fri, Oct 11, 2013
1:00pm
Inaugural Lecture of the Hugh and Ethel Kelly Lecture Series - Special Event (Burruss Hall Auditorium)
"How to Create a Bell Labs 2.0 in Today's Realities" presented by Nobel Laureate and distinguished 12th Secretary of Energy, Dr. Steven Chu
Thu, Oct 24, 2013
5:30pm
Open Access Week: Keynote Speech by John Willinsky, Distinguished Innovator in Residence - Special Event (Graduate Life Center auditorium)
John Willinsky is Khosla Family Professor of Education at Stanford University and Professor (Limited Term) of Publishing Studies at Simon Fraser University, where he directs the Public Knowledge Project, which conducts research and develops scholarly publishing software intended to extend the reach and effectiveness of scholarly communication. Join us for his talk, What Is It About the History of Learning that Calls Out for Open Access to Research and Scholarship?
Fri, Oct 25, 2013
3:00pm
John E. Peterson Distinguished Seminar Series - Academic (3001 Pamplin Hall)
"The Effect of Financial Constraints on Tax-motivated Income Shifting by U.S. Multinationals" by Scott Dyreng, Duke University
Tue, Nov 5, 2013
4:00pm
Science and Technology Leaders Series: NGA Director Tish Long - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Rd., 2nd Floor, Arlington, VA 22203; Blacksburg video conference, ICTAS 310)
Letitia Long, director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) will be the first speaker for the 2013-2014 Science and Technology Leaders Series. A Virginia Tech alumna, Long will present "Turning NGA's Challenges Into Transformational Opportunities." She will discuss the challenges and opportunities of leadership in the intelligence community, including delivering timely, relevant, accurate geospatial intelligence (GEOINT); making GEOINT accessible online, on-demand to customers; supporting mission partners, especially the warfighter; and acting as the driver toward a new dimension of intelligence. Long earned a B.S. in electrical engineering from Virginia Tech and a M.S. in mechanical engineering from the Catholic University of America. Among her numerous awards and decorations, Long received the Charlie Allen Award for Distinguished Intelligence Service from the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association in 2011. A reception will follow the presentation. RSVP by November 1.
Thu, Nov 14, 2013
5:30pm
Autism: New Mutations, Genes, and Pathways - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Evan Eichler, PhD Professor, Genome Sciences Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator University of Washington Seattle, Washington Member, U.S. National Academy of Sciences In this lecture, Evan Eichler, PhD, will summarize his laboratory's recent finding regarding the discovery of rare, large copy number variants (CNVs) and their contribution to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID). His team's analysis of more than 2500 children with ASD and 30,000 children with ID suggests that between 8 and 14 percent of disease is caused by deletions and duplications of large segments of the genome involving multiple genes. These mutations can be either inherited or found in the parents of children depending on the size of the event. Dr. Eichler will present evidence from exome and molecular inversion probe sequencing of more than 2000 parent-child trios with sporadic autism and show how these data may be used to pinpoint novel genes underlying CNV burden as well as provide insight into new pathways. Re-contact and follow-up of patients with the same de novo mutation shows, in some cases, striking similarities with respect to the phenotype. In other cases, Dr. Eichler's group finds that some of the same "disease-causing" mutations can manifest very differently and, in particular, be more severe if they occur on a background of other compounding mutations. They also find that both de novo mutations and inherited SNV and CNV mutations are contributing to simplex autism. They predict that the overall burden of rare and private gene-disruptive mutations will correlate with different outcomes. Dr. Eichler and his colleagues propose that the early development of the brain is particularly sensitive to the timing and expression of many different genes and that multiple genetic perturbations within specific pathways can lead to disease with varying severity. A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 9, 2014
5:30pm
Innovations in Stroke Neurorehabilitation - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Steven L. Wolf, PhD Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine Professor of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine Professor, Department of Cell Biology Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, Georgia Services for rehabilitation following a stroke are experiencing profound regression, necessitating the interface of new technologies, knowledge of plasticity within the nervous system, and cost-effective treatments as they are gradually being directed toward home-based environments. In this presentation, Dr. Wolf will explore some of the discoveries governing mixed reality as a vehicle to foster improvement in upper extremity function following a stroke while exploiting principles underlying neuroplasticity. His observations may offer a preview of the opportunities and responsibilities involved in bringing rehabilitation following catastrophic injury, such as a stroke, into the home environment. A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 16, 2014
5:30pm
Genes, Mutations, and Heart Valve Disease (CANCELLED) - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Roger R. Markwald, PhD Distinguished University Professor Chair, Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology Director, Cardiovascular Developmental Biology Center Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, South Carolina A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Screening the DNA of large multigenerational families has pinpointed two genes - filamin-A (FLNA) and dachsous 1 (DCHS1) - that, when mutated, result in mitral valve prolapse, a common cardiac degenerative disease that often leads to heart failure and is the leading cause of heart valve surgery. Dr. Markwald will discuss the role of FLNA, a cytoskeletal regulatory protein, and DCHS1, a cell polarity gene, which are normally expressed only during normal embryonic valve development. When either of these are mutated significantly, there is a long-term effect on the structural integrity of the heart's mitral valves. This increases the valves' susceptibility to changes in blood flow, inflammatory cytokines, and mechanical forces. Animal models of both mitral valve prolapse genes have provided insights into the pathways regulating valve growth and development, suggesting that so-called adult-onset cardiac diseases may have their roots in embryonic development. This has led to the discovery of new candidate therapeutic targets for early diagnosis and treatment of human heart valve diseases. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Sat, Jan 18, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sun, Jan 19, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Wed, Jan 22, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Thu, Jan 23, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Fri, Jan 24, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic:Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sat, Jan 25, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sun, Jan 26, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Wed, Jan 29, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Thu, Jan 30, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Fri, Jan 31, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic:Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sat, Feb 1, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sun, Feb 2, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Wed, Feb 5, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Thu, Feb 6, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Fri, Feb 7, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic:Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sat, Feb 8, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sun, Feb 9, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Wed, Feb 12, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Thu, Feb 13, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Fri, Feb 14, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic:Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sat, Feb 15, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sun, Feb 16, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Wed, Feb 19, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Thu, Feb 20, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Thu, Feb 20, 2014
5:30pm
What Is the BRAIN Initiative and What Will It Teach Us About Ourselves? - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Joshua Sanes, PhD Paul J. Finnegan Family Director, Harvard Center for Brain Science Jeff C. Tarr Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series A revolution is brewing in neuroscience. We are on the threshold of understanding how the electrical and chemical activities of huge ensembles of nerve cells account for our thoughts, decisions, behaviors, perceptions, and emotions. Dr. Sanes will discuss the BRAIN Initiative, a public-private partnership aimed at developing the new technologies needed to speed progress. Once obtained, he believes, this knowledge will enable new approaches to neurological and psychiatric disorders. It will also affect our views of seemingly distant areas, including the law, economics, and ethics. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the Virginia Tech Carilion Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Feb 21, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic:Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sat, Feb 22, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sun, Feb 23, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Wed, Feb 26, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Wed, Feb 26, 2014
7:00pm
In Search of a Modern Hercules: The Strongman and the Material Culture of the Gym in Global Perspective - Academic (3100 Torgersen Hall)
Dr. Simon Bronner is Distinguished Professor of American Studies & Folklore at Penn State-Harrisburg With origins as symbols of empire in Europe and with references to a revival of classical civilizations, the modern strongman became a theatrical sensation in the eighteenth century. Influenced by performances of Prussian Eugen Sandow on the American Ziegfeld stage and the rise of a "gym culture," in America the strongman became a popular culture icon since the late nineteenth century. Arguably, the modern Hercules or Samsons, as they were called, responded to a crisis of masculinity brought on by fears of industrialism's consequences. Ironically, a response to this crisis was to invent equipment and masculine environments in the gym for religious devotion to muscular development. During the twentieth century, health and fitness crazes, sparked by more mythological references, such as Charles Atlas, who preached a "gospel of strength," took hold in America. The narcissistic worship of the muscular body suffered during World War II America when the Nazis were castigated for their racist "superman" ideology. After the 1970s, however, in the wake of the women's movement and Cold War, American media sponsored strongman contests, often with international contestants from Russia, intended to showcase American bodily, and political, power. Against this historical background, twenty-first century contests have globalized further with Asian participants, still poised against American standards of strength. In this presentation, Bronner analyzes the meanings of these contests as symbolic texts in relation to what is perceived in a new crisis of masculinity as a feminizing, enervating world.
Thu, Feb 27, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Fri, Feb 28, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic:Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sat, Mar 1, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Sun, Mar 2, 2014
12:00pm
Adam Cvijanovic: Landscape: Another Dimension - Arts (Miles C. Horton Jr. Gallery, Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech)
Adam Cvijanovic, a New York-based hyperrealist painter, transforms the entire Upper Gallery with a site-specific installation. Cvijanovic's monumental murals and installations are distinguished by exceptional technical skill; an often implausible, even surreal sensibility; and an innovative use of house paint and acrylic on Tyvek, the synthetic material used in FedEx envelopes and housing insulation. The results, painted in sections and applied to wall surfaces, have been shown internationally in venues from New York to Sydney, Australia. For his project here, Cvijanovic will develop a new work in response to the New River Valley.
Mon, Mar 3, 2014
7:30pm
Department of Communication 5th Annual Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (2150 Torgersen)
The Department of Communication will host its 5th Annual Distinguished Lecture Monday, March 3, from 7:30-8:30 p.m. in 2150 Torgersen Hall on the Virginia Tech campus. Featured speaker Dhavan V. Shah will give a talk titled, "Mobilization, Socialization, and Participation in a Digital Age: Building the Communication Mediation Model." The event will be open to the public free of charge. The Distinguished Lecture event, held annually by the Department of Communication since 2010, features a leading scholar of international reputation who shares knowledge from a program of research on a communication-related topic that is of interest to the entire Virginia Tech community. The featured speaker presents one signature lecture on campus and takes part in a number of smaller events during an extended visit to Virginia Tech. The 2014 Distinguished Lecturer, Dhavan V. Shah, is the Louis A. & Mary E. Maier-Bascom Professor at the University of Wisconsin, where he is Director of the Mass Communication Research Center (MCRC) and Scientific Director in the Center for Health Enhancement System Studies (CHESS). Shah's research focuses on communication influence on social judgments, civic and political engagement, and health support and behavior. He has developed three major lines of inquiry, with his most recent work extending insights and techniques from his prior examinations of the influence of news framing and the power of online interactions into the development and deployment of digital technologies for individual and community health. These programs of research center on: (1) the influence of message framing and processing on decision-making and opinion formation; (2) the capacity of mass and interpersonal communication, especially online communication, to encourage civic engagement and political participation; and (3) the effects of computer-mediated interactions, particularly the expression of social support, on the management of cancer, aging, and addiction. Across these domains of work, he has increasingly applied computational techniques to social science questions, exploring the role of social media harvesting, machine text coding, communication network mapping, and "big data" analytics. Questions about the Distinguished Lecture event and other on-campus events featuring Dr. Shah can be directed to Dr. James D. Ivory, an associate professor in the Department of Communication (jivory@vt.edu; 540.231.6507).
Thu, Mar 6, 2014
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Series - Seminar/Conference (310 Kelly Hall)
Professor Scott Stephens of the University of Kentucky will present "Modeling of Radial Lip Seal Performance: A Multi-Physics Problem." The Spring 2014 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Series, supported by Techsburg, brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month March - May.
Thu, Mar 6, 2014
5:30pm
Brain School 2014 seminar: Mapping Depression Circuits: Foundation for New Treatment Strategies Using Deep Brain Stimulation - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Helen Mayberg, MD Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Radiology Dorothy C. Fuqua Chair of Psychiatric Neuroimaging and Therapeutics Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, Georgia A free public event as part of both Brain School 2014 and the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series. In the first seminar of Brain School 2014, Dr. Helen Mayberg will explore the foundations of deep brain stimulation as a treatment for depression. Critical to the development of this novel therapy for patients with treatment-resistant depression has been the further characterization of brain systems mediating normal and abnormal mood states as well as those mediating successful and unsuccessful response to various antidepressant interventions using functional neuroimaging. Registration for Brain School 2014 is free but required. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Tue, Mar 18, 2014
7:15pm
Medea Benjamin on Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control - Special Event (300 Whittemore Hall)
Medea Benjamin is a cofounder of both CODEPINK and the international human rights organization Global Exchange. Described as "one of America's most committed -- and most effective -- fighters for human rights" by New York Newsday, and called "one of the high profile leaders of the peace movement" by the Los Angeles Times, Medea has distinguished herself as an eloquent and energetic figure in the progressive movement. Ms. Benjamin recently published Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control, a comprehensive look and extensive analysis at the growing use of unmanned aircraft in lethal strikes on human targets.
Thu, Mar 20, 2014
3:00pm
Principals' Tea in the Honors Residential College - Special Event (Ambler Johnston East #4617)
Please join us for Principals' Tea with our special guest, the Distinguished Innovator in Residence 2014, Jer Thorp. Following the Tea, Thorp will be giving a public talk at 5:45pm in the GLC Auditorium. Principals' Tea is a weekly event for the Fellows of the Honors Residential College at Ambler Johnston Hall usually held on Friday. We welcome students and faculty from across campus to join us. Contact Jay Read (jayread@vt.edu) if you are interested in attending, so that you may be escorted into the residence hall.
Thu, Mar 20, 2014
5:30pm
Brain School 2014 seminar: How Social Relationships Help Build (and Rehabilitate) Our Brains - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Sharon Ramey, PhD Professor and Distinguished Research Scholar Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute Roanoke, Virginia A free public event as part of Brain School 2014. Our brains are hard wired to respond to other people. In this seminar, Dr. Sharon Ramey will explore how social relationships not only help build our brains, but may even be used to help rehabilitate brains that have been damaged in some way. Registration for Brain School 2014 is free but required. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 20, 2014
5:45pm
Making Big Data Human - Academic (Graduate Life Center Auditorium)
Distinguished Innovator in Residence Jer Thorp speaks on making big data human. Jer Thorp's work focuses on adding meaning and narrative to huge amounts of data as a way to help people take control of the information that surrounds them. He will speak about how he uses software-based art to bring big data sets to life. Jer Thorp is the former data artist in residence at The New York Times. His software-based art has been featured all over the world. His art brings big data sets to life, combining state-of-the-art science with a natural interest in the human condition. His 'Cascade' project at The New York Times visualizes the sharing of content through social media, offering tremendous insight into the way we use digital networks to share, influence, and connect with others. He was also a major contributor to the 9/11 memorial project in New York City, where he wrote a program that organized the names of victims not by alphabetical order, but by relationship-putting coworkers next to coworkers, and brothers next to brothers. Originally from Vancouver, he lives in New York City, where, along with his work at The New York Times, he teaches in NYU's ITP program. To investigate the entailments of Big Data, Thorp helped launch The Office for Creative Research with his peers. The Distinguished Innovator in Residence program is a partnership between Technology-enhanced Learning and Online Strategies (TLOS) and the University Libraries. Additional support provided by the Graduate School and the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences.
Thu, Mar 27, 2014
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Bill Bennett: The Promise of America in Challenging Times
Mon, Mar 31, 2014
11:15pm
International Consumer Policy: Lessons in Humility, Optimism, and Caution - Academic (1670 Litton Reeves)
Dr. Robert Mayer, Professor at the University of Utah and Distinguished Fellow of the American Council on Consumer Interests, will be the speaker at the 3rd Alfred and Shirley Wampler Caudill Lecture in Consumer Affairs.
Wed, Apr 2, 2014
1:00pm
Barbara Allen Lectures at National Science Foundation - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (NSF, North Entrance of Stafford I, located at the corner of Stuart and 9th Streets, Arlington, VA )
Barbara Allen, professor and co-director of the Science and Technology Studies graduate program in the National Capital Region, has been invited to be a guest speaker for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Distinguished Lecture Series. Allen's presentation is entitled "Beyond Ethics: Questions at the Intersection of Science, Technology, and Social Justice." Using examples from recent research in Science and Technology Studies, such as environmental justice in post-disaster planning in New Orleans, Allen will explore and expand the issue of justice,highlighting policy dimensions. She will address the following questions: How can different theories of justice be used to assess the efficacy of technological interventions? How might issues of justice inform and influence the scientific questions being asked? Can technological interventions promote the development of just communities? The lecture is free and open but requires an RSVP as all visitors to NSF must obtain a security badge before entering the building. RSVP in advance to contact below and bring a government-issued photo ID to this event to obtain your badge. The lecture will be held in Stafford 1-110
Wed, Apr 2, 2014
4:30pm
Everyone Matters Reception, featuring Nikki Giovanni - Diversity (Assembly Hall and Gallery | Holtzman Alumni Center)
Through the Civil Rights celebration, Virginia Tech will bring the Everyone Matters global campaign of inclusiveness and equality to Blacksburg. The program will include remarks by University Distinguished Professor Nikki Giovanni and a short film followed by a candlelight ceremony and reception. Registration will be required. Please check back for further information.
Thu, Apr 3, 2014
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Series - Seminar/Conference (310 Kelly Hall)
Professor Kenny Breuer of Brown University will present: "Elasticity and Flow: Flight, Propulsion and Energy-Harvesting Inspired by Animal Motion." The Spring 2014 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Series, supported by Techsburg, brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month March - May.
Thu, Apr 3, 2014
5:30pm
Charting Our Future Together: Envisioning a Diverse, Adaptive, Networked, Biomedical Science Ecosystem - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Gary Gibbons, MD Director, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland Member, Institute of Medicine U.S. National Academy of Sciences A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series As director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) at the National Institutes of Health, Gary Gibbons, MD, oversees the third largest Institute with an annual budget of approximately $3 billion and 1,000 employees. The NHLBI provides global leadership for research, training, and education programs to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, and blood disease and enhance the health of all individuals so that they can live longer and more fulfilling lives. In light of a changing political, fiscal, scientific, and technological landscape, the NHLBI initiated a strategic priority setting and resource management process that harnesses the collective intelligence of NHLBI staff, researchers, and stakeholders. These processes are guided by enduring principles to seize unprecedented opportunities to support transformative research that advances public health. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Apr 4, 2014
4:00pm
Computational Modeling and Data Analytics Distinguished Lecture Series - Academic (Torgersen 3100)
Nick Trefethen, FRS, NAE, is the Professor of Numerical Analysis at Oxford University and past president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). He will give a lecture entitled 'Continuous Analogues of Matrix Factorizations.' The algorithms of numerical linear algebra are tied to matrix factorizations such as LU, Cholesky, QR, and SVD. What happens to these factorizations if the discrete matrix becomes continuous in one dimension (a 'quasimatrix') or both (a 'cmatrix')? Such questions turn out to be related to a very active topic in computational sciences - low rank approximation of matrices. The talk will present some answers, including a discussion of the analogues of pivoting and triangular structure for continuous objects.
Thu, Apr 10, 2014
5:30pm
How Viruses Infect the Brain - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Terence S. Dermody, MD Dorothy Overall Wells Professor of Pediatrics and Pathology Director, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Lamb Center for Pediatric Research Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Many pathogenic viruses can spread throughout the body to cause disease. However, the mechanisms that guide viruses from the site of primary infection to sites of secondary infection in various organs are not well understood. Dr. Dermody studies a particular class of these viruses called reoviruses to better understand how they replicate and the mechanisms they use to cause disease. In his public lecture, he will discuss how reovirus can disseminate through the bloodstream and infect the central nervous system. Remarkably, different components of the protein shell that surround the reovirus are used to engage specific receptors. This work identifies factors in the virus itself and in the host that regulate the spread of the infectious agent and the subsequent injury to the targeted organs such as the brain. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Apr 17, 2014
7:00pm
Prophet Muhammad: A Mercy to Mankind - Seminar/Conference (Squires Student Center Virginia Tech: Brush Mountain B)
Islam is the religion of about 23% of the world's population, and the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon Him) holds a very important position in both the hearts of Islam's followers and in the faith. Have you every heard of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)? Chances are you've heard a lot of different things. Come out to this event and see what he was really all about and why he is known as a Mercy to Mankind! There will also be a question and answers session at the end, along with refreshments! Please arrive promptly at 7pm! This talk will given by our very own Dr. Rakha, a distinguished Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering here at Tech and a fellow Hokie! Learn more about him at: http://www.cee.vt.edu/people/rakha.html.
Thu, May 1, 2014
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Series - Seminar/Conference (310 Kelly Hall)
Professor Dennis Discher of the University of Pennsylvania will present: "Material Basics of Biology." The Spring 2014 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Series, supported by Techsburg, brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month March - May.
Thu, May 1, 2014
3:30pm
Pamplin Distinguished Scholar Speaker Series - Michael Jensen - Special Event (Alumni Assembly Hall, The Inn at VT)
"Beyond Agency Theory: The Power of Integrity" This event is open to the public.
Thu, May 1, 2014
5:30pm
What Makes the Human Brain Human - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Terrence J. Sejnowski, PhD Francis Crick Chair, Professor, and Head of Computational Neurobiology Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator The Salk Institute, La Jolla, California Member, U.S. National Academy of Sciences Member, NAS Institute of Medicine A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Dr. Sejnowski will discuss the progress that has been made in elucidating the structure, function, and connectivity of cellular circuits in the nervous system and how such large-scale information is revolutionizing our capacity to understand brain function and behavior. However, even the vast amounts of data being collected--including connectomics--will be far from sufficient for a deep understanding of the human brain, which contains an estimated 86 billion neurons. Even though the complete structure of the much "simpler" 302-neuron network of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans was published in the 1980s, without information on the activities of the neurons and all of their synaptic interactions, it was only an incomplete "wiring diagram." With modern tools to explore and analyze neuronal network function, understanding of the worm nervous system is now almost within reach. Yet the human brain poses even more daunting challenges for achieving a similar level of understanding. Dr. Sejnowski will discuss those challenges for interpreting patterns of activity in large-scale living networks of neurons as well as computational modeling approaches. He will consider how these approaches are changing the way we think about ourselves, asking such questions as: Has neuroeconomics replaced the rational-agent model of human behavior? How are disciplines such as education and ethics influenced by modern neuroscience? And how do we address the challenge of individual human brain functional differences? Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, May 22, 2014
5:30pm
Cancer and Aging - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Ronald A. DePinho, MD, PhD President MD Anderson Cancer Center University of Texas Houston, Texas Member, U.S. National Academy of Science Member, Institute of Medicine, U.S. National Academy of Science A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Join the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and Ronald A. DePinho, MD, PhD, for a talk on recent discoveries hat have led to better methods of early cancer detection, improved cancer patient care, and new cancer drugs. Such discoveries can come from a range of fields, including developing new biomarkers, discovering new cancer genes, uncovering new stem cell biology, and genetically engineering new mouse models to study cancer in humans. In a notable discovery, Dr. DePinho showed a link between advancing age and increasing risk in cancer. He established that three factors - telomere dysfunction, an impaired ability of a cell to repair DNA damage, and the continued renewal of the epithelial layer of tissue that covers organs - all unite to cause rearrangements in the DNA that drive the genesis of many common cancers. To learn more about telomeres and how aging pushes the human body toward cancerous tumors, be sure to attend. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Sep 11, 2014
5:30pm
Dopamine Neuron Regulation and its Disruption in Schizophrenia and Depression - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Anthony Grace, PhD Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience Professor of Psychiatry-Psychology University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series The dopamine system has been implicated in a number of psychiatric disorders ranging from schizophrenia to depression; however, the nature of the disruptions leading to such diverse conditions is unknown. By studying the mode of regulation of dopamine neuron firing and how it is altered in rodent models of human disorders, Dr. Grace has shown that alterations in the systems regulating dopamine neuron activity, rather than the dopamine neurons themselves, can potentially explain the pathophysiology of these disorders and provide insight into novel means of treatment. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Wed, Sep 17, 2014
7:00pm
Dept. of English Visiting Writers Series presents author Percival Everett - Special Event (Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Conference Center)
Please join the Virginia Tech Department of English's Visiting Writers Series for a reading by author Percival Everett at 7 PM Wednesday, September 17 in the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Conference Center (Address: 1015 Life Science Circle). Percival Everett is the author of more than twenty novels, three collections of short fiction, and two volumes of poetry. Among his novels, all published by Graywolf, are Percival Everett by Virgil Russell, Assumption, I Am Not Sidney Poitier, The Water Cure, Wounded, Glyph, Erasure, Zulus, Watershed, and God's Country. His poetry collections are Swimming Swimmers Swimming and re: f(gesture), both published by Red Hen Press. Everett is the recipient of the PEN Center USA Award for Fiction, the Academy Award from an American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, The Believer Book Award and a New American Writing Award. His stories have been included in the Pushcart Prize Anthology and Best American Short Stories. He is currently Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Southern California.
Thu, Oct 2, 2014
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (310 Kelly Hall)
Professor Jayathi Murthy of the University of Texas at Austin will be presenting: "Fast Multiscale Simulation Techniques for Sub-continuum Transport." The Fall 2014 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series, supported by Techsburg, brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month October - December.
Thu, Oct 2, 2014
5:30pm
Modern Treatment of Alcoholism - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Charles O'Brien, MD, PhD Kenneth Appel Professor of Psychiatry Department of Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Member, National Academy of Sciences Member, Institute of Medicine A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Alcoholism is a common, chronic disease with strong genetic influence. Modern neuroscience has disclosed much about the underlying mechanisms of this devastating condition, but few physicians are aware that effective treatments are available. Thus, relapse-prevention medications are rarely prescribed and affected families are not told that such treatments exist. In reality, modern medications and traditional talk therapy work well together once the anti-medication bias is relieved. Effective treatment saves not only pain and suffering, but also reduces costs to the health care system. The Affordable Care Act requires that all health insurance cover substance use disorders and this may lead to more citizens with alcoholism receiving modern treatment. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Nov 6, 2014
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (310 Kelly Hall)
Professor Chris Rahn of The Pennsylvania State University will present: "Fluidlastic Structures with Enhanced Vibration Damping, Absorption and Isolation." The Fall 2014 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series, supported by Techsburg, brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month October - December.
Tue, Nov 18, 2014
2:15pm
Disaster Resilience Symposium: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Coastal Resilience - Academic (1045 Pamplin Hall)
Virginia Tech's Interdisciplinary Coastal Hazards Research Team and the Disaster Resilience Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Program present an interdisciplinary symposium focused on the important issue of coastal resilience. The symposium will consist of a brief introduction and welcome followed by presentations from three distinguished speakers: Chad Briggs, strategy director for GlobalInt, will discuss how planning scenarios can address unique, highly uncertain futures and how public participation can help to inform scientific research and formal modeling. (2:30 to 3:30 p.m.) Brian Blanton, director of environmental initiatives at Renaissance Computing Institute at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, will discuss state-of-the-art numerical modeling methods, high-resolution representations of regional topography and bathymetry, and advanced statistical methods for generating improved digital flood insurance rate maps. (3:30 to 4:30 p.m.) Professor Donald Resio, director of the Taylor Engineering Research Institute at the University of Northern Florida, will present a talk that focuses on developing a global perspective for community resilience by examining the complexity of coastal problems and uncertainties in a number of areas around the globe. (4:30 to 5:30 p.m.) Attendees are welcome to join the symposium for either some or all of the presentations.
Thu, Nov 20, 2014
5:30pm
Influenza Virus Host Tropism - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, MD, PhD Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases Director, Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute Mount Sinai Medical Center New York, New York A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Dr. Garcia-Sastre will discuss the ability of specific animal influenza viruses to infect humans and the concerns about pandemic potential. His laboratory is studying the determinants associated with increased human infections of these non-human influenza virus strains, and how to prevent them. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Dec 4, 2014
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (310 Kelly Hall)
Professor Rob Wood of Harvard University will present: "Manufacturing, Actuation, Sensing, and Control for Robotic Insects." The Fall 2014 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series, supported by Techsburg, brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month October - December.
Thu, Dec 4, 2014
5:30pm
Epigenetics and the Immune System - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Jeremy Boss, PhD Professor and Chair Department of Microbiology and Immunology Emory University School of Medicine A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Epigenetics refers to the processes by which cells inherit information that dictate their ultimate properties and functions. Dr. Boss's seminar will focus on how these processes control the ability of various cells within the immune system to respond to infection or in the case of autoimmune disease may have initiated a program that leads to disease. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Dec 5, 2014
4:00pm
11th Annual Burian-McNabb Distinguished Lecture - Seminar/Conference (103A Surge )
Anya Plutynski: Department of Philosophy, Washington University, St. Louis "The Evolution of Failure: Cancer as Evolutionary Process and Product"
Thu, Jan 8, 2015
5:30pm
Linking Discoveries in Developmental Biology to 3-Dimensional Printing of New Tissues and Micro-Organs - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Roger R. Markwald, PhD Distinguished University Professor Chair, Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology Director, Cardiovascular Developmental Biology Center Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, South Carolina A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Tissue and organ failures due to degenerative diseases and injury are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, exacerbated by the challenge of a shortage of organ donors. To address the need for lifesaving organs, Dr. Markwald's laboratory is pioneering 3-D bioprinting using adult stem cells, biomimetic hydrogels, and the principles of developmental biology to engineer functional, multi-tissue replacements suitable for surgical implantation. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 22, 2015
3:30pm
Poverty, Biology, and Health: Will the Circle Be Unbroken? - VTC (Fralin Life Science Institute Auditorium)
Drs. Sharon and Craig Ramey, professors and distinguished research scholars at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, will present two seminars as part of the Fourth Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Week Seminars.The Rameys knew Dr. King and have been highly involved nationally in promoting and addressing issues of health disparities and race in the United States. Drs. Ramey will present recent findings from their research on the intergenerational and lifelong effects of impoverished environments, and the extent to which systematic, theory-driven interventions can improve health outcomes. The Rameys will also discuss the search for biological and behavioral mechanisms responsible for perpetuating, as well as altering, the negative effects of poverty.
Fri, Jan 23, 2015
12:20pm
The Civil Rights of Health, Education, and Biology: MLK's Enduring Legacy - VTC (Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Auditorium)
Drs. Sharon and Craig Ramey, professors and distinguished research scholars at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, will present two seminars as part of the Fourth Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Week Seminars. The Rameys knew Dr. King and have been highly involved nationally in promoting and addressing issues of health disparities and race in the United States. Why is eliminating health and educational disparities a crucial goal for the future of our nation? After reviewing historical scientific findings about the impact of race and poverty on the life course, Drs. Sharon and Craig Ramey will propose a new national agenda that links education and health as the most compelling ways to overcome the entrenched inequities and health disparities that endure as a legacy of racism and classism. The Rameys will also discuss specific actionable knowledge that can form a basis for how the Virginia Tech community can become engaged at all levels.
Thu, Feb 5, 2015
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Series - Seminar/Conference (Holden Auditorium)
Professor Kon-Well Wang of the University of Michigan will present: "Recent Advances in Adaptive Metastructures for Structural Dynamics Enhancement." Hosted by Prof. Lei Zuo The Spring 2015 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month February - May.
Sun, Feb 15, 2015
3:00pm
Musica Viva Presents: Valentine's Day Concert - Music/Theatre/Dance (Squire's Recital Salon)
This is a special concert to celebrate Valentine's Day. Two couples are performing music related to Love: Teresa and David Ehrlich will perform Beethoven's Romance for violin and piano, and Ariana and Benjamin Wyatt will perform love songs for soprano and cello. Also featuring is the slow movement from piano quartet No. 3 by Brahms, composed after the Schumanns lost one of their young children. One can clearly hear the great love Brahms had for Clara Schumann and the sadness he felt. The second half will feature one of the great works in the chamber music literature: Schubert's cello quintet. Three distinguished guests are featuring as well, two are performing first time on this series. Guests are Wanchi Huang, violin; Daniel Sweaney, viola, and Nicole Johnson, cello.
Thu, Mar 5, 2015
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (Holden Auditorium)
Professor Alan Epstein of MIT and Pratt and Whitney will present: "Propulsion for the Next 30 Years of Commercial Aviation." Hosted by Professor Wing Ng The Spring 2015 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month February - May.
Tue, Mar 17, 2015
12:00pm
SIREN Seminar: Chuck Casto - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Road, Arlington, VA 22203)
Charles "Chuck" Casto, former manager of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), will discuss "Extreme Event Leadership" as part of Virginia Tech's Seminar on Interdisciplinary Research and Education in Nuclear Emergency Response (SIREN) series. Casto joined the NRC in 1985 as an operator licensing examiner and was subsequently appointed to a number of leadership positions. In March 2011, he served as the lead NRC executive providing support to the Japanese government and the U.S. Ambassador. After the earthquake and tsunami that affected several reactors at Fukushima Daiichi, Casto served as director for Site Operations for 11 months. He participated in an OECD mission in Japan to help reestablish its regulatory body and helped define criteria to restart nuclear plants in Japan in 2012. President Obama has honored him with a Distinguished Executive award. Graduate students are encouraged to arrive at 11:30 a.m. for an opportunity to chat with Casto. Light refreshments will be served. The SIREN series features leading international experts on nuclear emergency response. Hosted by the Department of Science and Technology in Society, the series is being presented as part of a National Science Foundation CAREER grant. RSVP in link below to attend in person or to sign up for a live stream.
Thu, Mar 19, 2015
2:30pm
Town Hall Meeting With Provost Search Committee - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Road, Ballston Rm. 2nd Floor, Arlington, VA 22203)
As the search for the next Executive Vice President and Provost to succeed Mark McNamee gets underway, the search committee is very interested in hearing your thoughts about the search process and the qualities that you feel the ideal candidate should possess. Recognizing that the National Capital Region may have a distinct perspective on the search, search committee co-chairs Timothy D. Sands, University President, and Paul Knox, University Distinguished Professor and Senior Fellow for International Advancement, invite faculty, staff, and students to attend this town hall meeting to hear your thoughts and to answer your questions. Visit the sponsor website that has been created to provide information about the status of the search.
Thu, Mar 19, 2015
5:30pm
Infectious Causes of Heart Failure: Viral Myocarditis - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Kirk Knowlton, MD Chief Division of Cardiology Edith and William M. Perlman Chair in Clinical Cardiology University of California San Diego School of Medicine San Diego, California A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 26, 2015
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture: Doris Kearns Goodwin - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Renowned presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin will give Virginia Tech's Cutchins Distinguished Lecture, "Leadership Lessons from the White House." Goodwin will share stories, intimate insights, in-depth analysis, and illustrate the individual and universal qualities of great U.S. presidents that will continue to inspire future leaders. She first visited campus as a Cutchins Distinguished Speaker in 2007.
Thu, Apr 2, 2015
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (Holden Auditorium)
Dean Vijay Dhir of the University of California, Los Angeles will present: "Effect of Reduced Gravity on Nucleate Pool Boiling Heat Transfer." Hosted by Professor Srinath Ekkad The Spring 2015 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month February - May.
Tue, Apr 7, 2015
7:30pm
"The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War" - Special Event (Owens Banquet Room)
Why did Karl Marx, Giuseppe Garibaldi, and Napoleon III care about the American Civil War? Why did the Confederacy send diplomats and secret agents to European capitals? Distinguished historian Don H. Doyle explores these and other questions in a lecture on the wide-ranging international significance of the American Civil War. A free lecture, sponsored by the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies with the generous support of the William and Elizabeth Latham Endowment Fund. Reception begins at 7:00 PM and lecture begins at 7:30.
Fri, Apr 10, 2015
4:00pm
The G.V. Loganathan Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Owens Hall Banquet Room)
Dr. Vijay Singh is a University Distinguished Professor and is the inaugural holder of the Caroline & William N. Lehrer Distinguished Chair in Water Engineering at Texas A&M University. He obtained a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Colorado State University, and a D.Sc. in Water Resources Engineering from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. The G.V. Loganathan Distinguished Lecture Series was established to honor the contributions of scholarship, instruction and service by Dr. G.V. Loganathan in the area of water resources engineering and in memory of Dr. Loganathan and his students of the Advanced Hydrology class, 2007. G.V. Loganathan was an internationally renowned researcher in the field of engineering hydrology and water resources systems. G.V. joined the Virginia Tech faculty in 1982 after completing his Ph.D. degree from the School of Civil Engineering at Purdue University. G.V. wrote more than 150 peer-reviewed academic publications on a variety of topics including urban stormwater hydrology, drought modeling and low-flow analysis, optimization and decision analysis and drinking-water infrastructure.
Fri, Apr 17, 2015
10:10am
Bradley Distinguished Lecture -- Steve Mollenkopf - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (Broadcast live to 900 N. Glebe Road, 2nd Floor Ballston Room, Arlington, VA 22314)
Steve Mollenkopf, chief executive officer of Qualcomm, and a graduate of Virginia Tech in electrical engineering ('92), will present the Bradley Distinguished Lecture on the importance of diversity in innovation. The lecture, taking place at Goodwin Hall, Quillen Family Auditorium in Blacksburg, will be broadcast live to the National Capital Region. Attendees in the NCR will have an opportunity to submit questions for the speaker. For more than 20 years, Mollenkopf has helped define and implement Qualcomm's strategy and technologies. During his tenure as president and chief operating officer, Qualcomm has become a leader in mobile technology, including computing, graphics, and multimedia. Mollenkopf also serves on the company's board of directors.
Thu, Apr 30, 2015
5:30pm
Drug Safety: Ameliorating the Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Gail Robertson, PhD Professor of Neuroscience University of Wisconsin - Madison Madison, Wisconsin A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Every day, sudden cardiac death unexpectedly claims lives because of adverse drug reactions, inherited conditions, and environmental influences. Often, those lost are very young and seemingly healthy individuals. Dr. Robertson's lecture will review the science of arrhythmias causing sudden cardiac death, how they can be triggered by drugs, and how academic scientists, pharmaceutical industry safety experts and federal officials work together to ensure the ongoing development of new and safe drugs. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, May 7, 2015
3:30pm
Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series - Seminar/Conference (Holden Auditorium)
Professor Michael Todd of the University of California, San Diego will present: "A Bayesian Experimental Design Approach to Structural Health Monitoring with Specific Application to Ultrasonic Interrogation." Hosted by Professor Pablo Tarazaga The Spring 2015 Mechanical Engineering Distinguished Speaker Seminar Series brings reputable speakers to campus giving presentations of broad appeal in engineering research and will occur on the first Thursday of the month February - May.
Thu, May 7, 2015
4:00pm
NCR Faculty Association 2015 Distinguished Lecture: Tom Grizzard - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Road, 2nd Floor Ballston Room, Arlington, VA 22203)
Thomas J. Grizzard, Professor Emeritus in the Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech, will give the National Capital Region Association Distinguished Lecture Series Last Lecture, "WATER, WATER, EVERYWHERE nor any drop to drink." Grizzard recently retired from the university as the director of the Occoquan Laboratory in Manassas, Virginia, a position he held for 40 years. In the course of his career, his teaching, research, and outreach have contributed to the sustainability of the urban landscapes in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, and to the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. In the early 1980's, Grizzard helped introduce graduate education in civil and environmental engineering to the National Capital Region. A reception will precede and follow the presentation. Click on link below for more information and RSVP link.
Tue, May 19, 2015
12:00pm
SIREN Series: James O. Ellis Jr. - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Road, Arlington, VA)
James O. Ellis, Jr., an Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, will present a Seminar on Interdisciplinary Research and Education in Nuclear Emergency Response (SIREN) on "Fukushima: An International Wake Up Call." Jim Ellis is a retired 4-star Admiral and a former Commander of the U.S. Strategic Command, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. After completing his distinguished thirty-nine-year Navy career in 2004, Ellis served as president and CEO of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) until 2012. When Fukushima happened, he was the first to propose a global nuclear response group -- an idea he also promoted as a member of the governing board of WANO, the World Association of Nuclear Operators. Graduate students are encouraged to arrive at 11:30 a.m. for an opportunity to chat with Ellis. Light refreshments will be served. The SIREN series features leading international experts on nuclear emergency response. Hosted by the Department of Science and Technology in Society, the series is being presented as part of a National Science Foundation CAREER grant. RSVP at www.siren5.eventbrite.com to attend in person or to sign up for a live stream. To submit a question to the speaker, e-mail siren@vt.edu.
Thu, May 21, 2015
5:30pm
Fear and Fear Related Disorders: From Pavlov to PTSD - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Kerry Ressler, MD, PhD Professor Yerkes National Primate Research Center Emory University Atlanta, Georgia Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Member Institute of Medicine A public lecture in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Distinguished Scholars Series Dr. Ressler will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular neurobiological mechanisms underlying fear processing in rodent models. He will then explore how this translates to fear-related disorders in humans. Through specific molecular, optogenetic and chemogenetic manipulations of fear circuits, it is hoped that novel treatments and interventions can be identified. He will then discuss new findings from human genetics research pointing to molecular genetic pathways that may further our understanding of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and fear processing in traumatized human populations. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jun 4, 2015
7:30pm
Uncommon Faces Multicultural Speaker Series - Diversity (Virginia Tech Research Center - Arlington 900 North Glebe Road Arlington, VA 22203)
Uncommon Faces Multicultural Speaker Series Featuring Virginia Tech Alumnus Pierre Thomas, the Senior Justice Correspondent for ABC News You are invited to attend the inaugural event of the Uncommon Faces Multicultural Speaker Series, which features distinguished alumni from diverse backgrounds who are making positive impacts in their communities and career fields. Thursday, June 4th, 2015 Reception - 7:30pm Registration: https://secure.hosting.vt.edu/alumni.vt.edu/event_management/registration_forms/pie.php Program - 8:00pm Virginia Tech Research Center - Arlington 900 North Glebe Road Arlington, VA 22203 No Charge Hors d'Oeuvres Provided Business Casual Attire
Fri, Sep 18, 2015
2:30pm
Clifford W. Randall Distinguished Lecture - Academic (Owens Banquet Hall)
The Clifford W. Randall Lecture Series has been established to honor the long and dedicated career of Dr. Randall to the Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Program in the Via Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Lutgarde Raskin, from the University of Michigan will be speaking about "Leveraging the Benefits of Microbes in Drinking Water Systems."
Wed, Sep 23, 2015
5:30pm
CBIA Distinguished Speaker Series-Social Media Marketing: Make it Work For You - Academic (Pamplin Hall, Room 1045)
"Social isn't a destination; it's a lens..." Please join the CBIA program and Tech community on Wednesday, September 23rd as guest speaker Kurth Wirth shares valuable insight on his concept of the technological curve. As one of many topics, he will address how social represents a paradigm shift in how humans understand one another and the world around them. Kurt is the Social Media Manager, Data Analyst & Digital Media Strategist at GEICO. Over the previous year and a half, he's overhauled GEICO's social presence into a lens through which the company proactively engages in communities across the nation. Don't miss out on Kurt's valuable advice to all on how you can make social media work for you.
Thu, Sep 24, 2015
3:30pm
BB&T Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Assembly Hall of the Holtzman Alumni Center)
The speaker will be Nicole Gelinas of the Manhattan Institute. She is the Searle Freedom Trust Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of the City Journal. Gelinas writes on urban economics and finance, municipal and corporate finance, and business issues. She is a Chartered Financial Analyst and a member of the New York Society of Securities Analysts.
Thu, Oct 15, 2015
12:00pm
Public Health Grand Rounds: Karen Roberto - Seminar/Conference (Vet Med Room 125)
Family Care and Community Support for Older Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment Karen Roberto, PhD University Distinguished Professor Adult Development and Aging, Department of Human Development Director, Center for Gerontology Director of the Institute for Society, Culture and Environment Virginia Tech Public Health Grand Rounds provide a regular forum for discussion and communication on significant topics in public health research, policy, and practice. These seminars are collaboratively organized by the Department of Population Health Sciences/Public Health Program, the Center for Public Health Practice and Research, and the student organizations Public Health Association @ VT and American Mock World Health Organization. Public Health Grand Rounds are open to the public.
Fri, Oct 16, 2015
10:00am
Art Curator Raymond Foye at Virginia Tech - Arts (Armory 101 @ 201 Draper Road in Blacksburg)
SOVA and the Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech presents Art Curator and Author Raymond Foye. Drawing on a varied and distinguished career that has taken him from editorial posts at the famed City Lights Books to a key player at Gagosian-one of he world's most powerful galleries-archivist to the likes of Dylan and Ginsberg and more, Foye will lead us on a virtual journey through the worlds of contemporary art & literature.
Tue, Nov 3, 2015
3:30pm
Speakeasy Reading Series Presents Poetry/Editor Don Bogen - Special Event (Shanks Hall 370/380)
The VT Speakeasy Writers Series is pleased to welcome poet, editor and translator Don Bogen, who will read his own poetry, as well as Spanish translations, and discuss publishing. Bogen is the McMicken Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Cincinnati and is the long-time poetry editor of "The Cincinnati Review. He is author of several poetry collections, as well. (Please see www.donbogen.com) He has received awards that include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Camargo Foundation and an Ingram Merrill Foundation Grant. He received a Fulbright Senior Lectureship to Spain and the Fulbright Distinguished Scholar Award to Queen's University in Belfast.
Thu, Nov 5, 2015
2:00pm
Optimal Agricultural Land Use: Food, Energy, or Environmental Services? - Seminar/Conference (VBI Conference Room)
Cathy Kling, Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences and a professor of economics, has served as the director of CARD since July 2013, after having served many years as the division head of CARD's Resource and Environmental Policy Division. She received a bachelor's degree in business and economics from the University of Iowa and a doctorate in economics from the University of Maryland. In her work at CARD, Kling is undertaking research to examine how agricultural practices affect water quality, wildlife, soil carbon content, and greenhouse gases.
Fri, Nov 6, 2015
11:15am
Department of Computer Science Distinguished Lecture Series - Seminar/Conference (Torgersen 2150)
Lecturer -Dr. Pankaj Agarwal, Duke University: Dr. Agarwal earned his PhD in Computer Science from the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University. He joined Duke University in 1989 where he is now the RJR Nabisco Professor of Computer Science and a Professor of Mathematics. He was the Chair of the Department of Computer Science from 2004 to 2010. His research interests include geometric computing, spatial databases, geographic information systems, sensor networks, and robotics. A Sloan Fellow, an ACM Fellow, and a National Young Investigator, Dr. Agarwal has authored four books and more than 350 research articles. He serves or has served on the editorial boards of a number of journals and on the advisory boards of many institutes and centers.
Mon, Nov 9, 2015
6:00pm
"Race, Place and Gender in the South - A Medical Anthropological Perspective" - Seminar/Conference (Newman Library Multipurpose Room)
The Black Lives in the New South Speaker Series would like to invite you to "Race, Place and Gender in the South - A Medical Anthropological Perspective" presented by Dr. Valerie Ann Johnson. Dr. Valerie Ann Johnson is Mott Distinguished Professor of Women's Studies, Director of Africana Women's Studies and formerly Associate Director of the Honors Program at Bennett college in Greensboro, North Carolina. As a scholar and educator Johnson engages in activities that promote the stewardship of the natural, historic, and cultural resources in North Carolina as part of the larger global community; foster scholarship in the area of women and girls health; and actively participates in the support and growth of Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Sponsored by: the Women and Minority Artists and Scholars Lecture Series, the Women's and Gender Studies Program, the Department of Sociology, the Gloria Smith Professor of Africana Studies, and the Race and Social Policy Research Center.
Fri, Nov 20, 2015
11:15am
Department of Computer Science Distinguished Lecture Series - Academic (Torgersen 2150)
Jim Kurose, a Distinguished University Professor at UM Amherst and Assistant Director of NSF for computer and information science and engineering (CISE) will speak on Friday, November 20, 2015. Advances in computer and information science and engineering are providing unprecedented opportunities for research and education. The talk will begin with an overview of CISE activities and programs at the National Science Foundation and include a discussion of current trends that are shaping the future of our discipline. He will also discuss the opportunities as well as the challenges that lay ahead for our community and for CISE.
Fri, Jan 29, 2016
4:00pm
Burian-McNabb Distinguished Lecture: Ana Rosa Barahona Echeverria - Special Event (Surge 118B)
Anna Rosa Barahona Echeverria Department of Evolutionary Biology National Autonomous University of Mexico
Thu, Feb 4, 2016
5:30pm
Health Care in America: From Politics to Progress! - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
Darrell G. Kirch, MD President and Chief Executive Officer Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Member, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies Washington, DC A public lecture in the distinguished-scholars-series/2015">VTCRI Distinguished Public Lecture Series Today's political, economic, and health realities present significant opportunities to shape the U.S. health care system so it provides better care to more people at reasonable cost. U.S. health care has entered a period of massive transformation, presenting opportunities to address health disparities and access issues. The country's medical schools and teaching hospitals have been leaders in recognizing and seizing these opportunities to create and sustain a health care system that is team based, highly collaborative, and above all, patient centered. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe at 5:00 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, PhD, Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Fri, Feb 5, 2016
11:15pm
Department of Computer Science Distinguished Lecture Series - Seminar/Conference (Torgersen 2150)
Lecturer - Dr. Frank Tip Bio: Frank Tip is a Senior Principal Engineer at Samsung Research America in Mountain View, California and an Adjunct Professor at the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo. Previously, he was a Professor and Cheriton Research Chair in the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo (2012-2014), and a Research Staff Member and Manager at the Software Technology Department at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center (1995-2012). He received his PhD in 1995 from the University of Amsterdam. Frank's research interests include: program analysis, refactoring, test generation, fault localization, automated program repair, data-centric synchronization, and analysis of web applications.
Tue, Feb 16, 2016
3:30pm
College of Science Dean Candidate's Open Forum Presentation: Rebecca W. Doerge - Administration (Latham Ballroom B, Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center)
Rebecca Doerge is one of three dean's candidates within the Virginia Tech College of Science. Doerge is the Trent and Judith Anderson Distinguished Professor of Statistics at Purdue University. She joined Purdue University in 1995 and holds a joint appointment between the Colleges of Agriculture (Department of Agronomy) and Science (Department of Statistics). She has over 30 years of experience as a faculty member, researcher, and leader in higher education, bringing a multi-disciplinary focus to her work throughout. Most recently, she also served as Head of the Department of Statistics at Purdue for five years. She holds a Master of Statistics in Mathematics from the University of Utah and a Ph.D. in Statistics with a minor in Genetics from North Carolina State University. View Rebecca Doerge's Curriculum Vitae at link below. The Open Forum Presentation will be streamed live for remote participation. Questions may be submitted remotely during the open forum by emailing forumquestions@vt.edu. Following Dr. Doerge's Open Forum Presentation, viewers are welcome to provide feedback.
Thu, Mar 17, 2016
12:30pm
Open Education Week Keynote: Expert authored, free, and reproducible educational resources - Seminar/Conference (Newman Library Multipurpose Room (1st floor))
Robert Biswas-Diener, Ph.D. presents on the NOBA Project, which brings together 90+ expert-authored and openly licensed learning modules in the field of Psychology. Join us in hearing about this faculty-initiated project, the underlying motivations, lessons learned, considerations for adoption, and research on NOBA materials. This session will be of interest to faculty, students and staff interested in innovative resources for education, those exploring alternative textbooks, and individuals interested in outreach and education for all. Additional comments will be made by distinguished and award-winning Professors Dr. Ed and Carol Diener. Light refreshments to follow. NLI registration for faculty, staff, and students: https://app.nli.tlos.vt.edu/#?offering=3837 General public registration: http://goo.gl/forms/1C22Dj0BSZ
Thu, Mar 24, 2016
5:30pm
Biological Pacing Still Coming: But How? When? Where? - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke)
A part of the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute Distinguished Public Lecture Series, Michael R. Rosen will speak on the pro mist, progress, and pitfalls of biological pacing approaches to expand the therapeutic targets of electronic pacing.
Fri, Apr 8, 2016
3:00pm
The G.V. Loganathan Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Owens Banquet Hall)
The G.V. Loganathan Distinguished Lecture Series was established to honor the contributions of scholarship, instruction and service by Dr. G.V. Loganathan in the area of water resources engineering and in memory of Dr. Loganathan and his students of the Advanced Hydrology class, 2007. This year's speaker is Dr. Rafael L. Bras is the provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Bras is a professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and the first Tech faculty member to hold the K. Harrison Brown Family Chair.
Thu, Apr 21, 2016
4:45pm
Global Change Center Distinguished Lecture: Dr. Josh Tewksbury - Special Event (The Lyric Theatre)
Dr. Josh Tewksbury, Director, Colorado Global Hub, Future Earth; Research Professor, University of Colorado, Boulder; and Senior Scholar, School of Global Environmental Sustainability, Colorado State University. About FUTURE EARTH: Future Earth is a major international research platform providing the knowledge and support to accelerate our transformations to a sustainable world. Lecture title: LIVING IN THE ANTHROPOCENE: Science, Sustainability, and Society.
Fri, Apr 22, 2016
8:30am
English Department Distinguished Alumni Board Meeting - Special Event (Shanks Hall)
The English Distinguished Alumni Board Meeting will be held in Shanks Hall from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
Fri, May 27, 2016
10:00am
SDAL Seminar: Investigating Nested Geographic Structure in Consumer Purchases: A Bayesian Dynamic Multi-scale Spatiotemporal Modeling Approach - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Road, 2nd Floor, Arlington, VA 22203)
Depak K. Dey, board of trustees, distinguished professor and associate dean, University of Connecticut, Storrs, will present "Investigating Nested Geographic Structure in Consumer Purchases: A Bayesian Dynamic Multi-scale Spatiotemporal Modeling Approach." During his talk, Dey will discuss how empirical application with a U.S. company's catalog purchase data from 1997 to 2001 reveals a nested geographic market structure that spans geopolitical boundaries such as state borders. The multi-scale model also has better performance in estimation and prediction compared to several spatial and spatiotemporal models. You can also join this event by phone through WebEx by dialing: 1-855-749-4750 US TOLL FREE 1-415-655-0001 US TOLL Meeting number/access code: 642 029 768 If you are an individual with a disability and desire an accommodation, please contact Tracie Hase (info below) during regular business hours at least 10 business days prior to the event.
Thu, Oct 6, 2016
11:00am
Virginia Tech Retirees Association Fall Luncheon - Special Event (Custom Catering)
Virginia Tech Retirees Association members are invited to a fall luncheon. Guest speaker Tony Distler, Alumni Distinguished Professor Emeritus, will discuss the late-20th Century and early 21st Century "Arts Explosion" that has transformed Virginia Tech. To register, contact Teresa Lyons at 540-231-3463.
Fri, Nov 4, 2016
9th Annual English Career Connections - Seminar/Conference (Shanks Hall)
9th Annual English Career Connections; Registration Required At the ECC, members of the English Department's Distinguished Alumni Board meet with students and share how their background in English has led to successful careers in law, finance, education, information technology, aeronautics, conservation, non-profit organizations, professional writing, and entrepreneurship. Students and alumni participate in career search related activities including roundtable discussions, a professional luncheon, and a keynote by Donna Mitchell, Vice President - Wealth Management, UBS financial Services, Inc. Students also have the opportunity to practice their interviewing skills one-on-one or have his/her resume reviewed by a member of the DAB. Students may also attend information sessions that run concurrent to the interviews and resume reviews. These sessions, led by career specialists, focus on careers in creative writing, technical and professional writing, law, education, language and literature, finding internships, and applying to graduate school. Participants gain knowledge about preparing for careers following graduation, job search strategies, and strategies that leaders use to succeed. They also attend a professional luncheon with tips on making a good impression in social situations.
Thu, Jan 19, 2017
5:30pm
Neurocircuitry of Addiction: An Alcohol Perspective - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
George F. Koob, Ph.D. Director, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health A public lecture in the distinguished-scholars-series/2016/">Eric Shullman Distinguished Public Lecture Series Alcohol and drug addiction is defined as a chronically relapsing disorder of compulsive alcohol and drug seeking that progresses through three stages: binge/intoxication, withdrawal/negative affect, and preoccupation/anticipation. It can be linked to corresponding functional and neurocircuitry domains. Via these stages, addiction impacts multiple motivational mechanisms and can be conceptualized as a disorder that includes elements of both positive and negative reinforcement. Three key neurobiological circuits are engaged in the motivational changes driving addiction that involve dysregulation in incentive salience-reward systems, sensitization of brain stress systems, and deficits in executive function systems. Specific neurocircuitry/neurochemical elements for these functional stages and motivational changes include the basal ganglia (incentive salience-reward deficits such as those involving dopamine), the extended amygdala (recruitment of the brain stress systems such as corticotropin releasing factor and dynorphin), and the prefrontal cortex (executive function deficits such as those involving glutamate). The combination of dysregulated incentive salience-reward function, sensitized stress systems, and disrupted prefrontal executive function provides a powerful motivation for compulsive alcohol use and the loss of control over alcohol taking. Understanding the neurocircuitry neuroadaptations in the reward, stress, and executive function systems is providing new insights into diagnosis, prevention, and treatment for alcohol addiction. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, Ph.D., Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jan 19, 2017
5:30pm
Eric N. Shullman Distinguished Public Lecture Series - Neurocircuitry of Alcohol Addiction - Research (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
George Koob, the director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, will discuss the neurocircuitry of alcohol addiction at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute.
Thu, Jan 26, 2017
3:00pm
Virginia Tech Center for the Humanities Director Finalists Open-Forum Presentation - Gary Taylor - Academic (Graduate Life Center, Room F)
The Open-Forum Presentation introduces Gary Taylor, the second of three finalists for the position of founding director of the Virginia Tech Center for the Humanities. Taylor, the author or editor of 26 books, is the George Matthew Edgar Professor of English and a Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University, where he became the founding director of the interdisciplinary History of Text Technologies program. Taylor served as general editor of the Oxford editions of Shakespeare's Complete Works, which, upon its publication in 1986, helped sharpen scholarly interest in the Bard's role at the intersection of literature and theater arts. He also edited the collected works of "the other Shakespeare," Thomas Middleton, a volume that won the Modern Language Association's biennial prize for a Distinguished Scholarly edition and the Emily Dietz Award for Outstanding Publication in Early Modern Studies. Taylor earned his doctorate in English from the University of Cambridge. There will be a reception immediately following the presentation.
Thu, Jan 26, 2017
5:30pm
Defining New Pathways For Human Arrhythmia - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Peter J. Mohler, Ph.D. Director, Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute Chair, Department of Physiology and Cell Biology Professor, Departments of Internal Medicine and Physiology and Cell Biology William D. and Jacquelyn L. Wells Chair in Cardiovascular Research Associate Dean, Basic Research The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center An event in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Eric Shullman Distinguished Public Lecture Series During his lecture, Dr. Mohler will illustrate new biological pathways underlying heart failure and arrhythmia, with a specific focus on the complexities of treating excitable cell disease. Cardiac cells, like other cells in the body, communicate via an exchange of signals across a membrane. Key to this membrane signaling are ion channels and transporters that tune the electrical activity of each cell. In fact, we now know that human genetic mutations in these channels may cause fatal forms of cardiac arrhythmia. Dr. Mohler and his team discovered a few forms of human arrhythmia based not on mutations in the ion channels themselves, but on the proteins that target (or localize) these channels at the cell membrane. Moreover, his group has used these findings as a platform to study the molecular pathways underlying membrane targeting in the heart, with the goal of defining new therapies to treat both congenital and acquired forms of arrhythmia. Dr. Mohler will share more of his research findings, and potential implications for the health of the human heart, during his presentation. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, Ph.D., Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Wed, Feb 1, 2017
4:00pm
Hume Center CyberLeaders Seminar Series: Teresa Shea - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (900 N. Glebe Road, 2nd Floor, Arlington, VA 22203)
The Hume Center is launching a CyberLeaders Seminar Series with a talk by Teresa Shea, executive vice president and director of Cyber-Reboot at In-Q-Tel. Shea joined In-Q-Tel after a distinguished 32-year career with the National Security Agency (NSA). She held several key leadership assignments during her career, culminating as the director of Signals Intelligence (SIGINT). The series is open to all members of the Virginia Tech community. It will be broadcast in Blacksburg at the North End Center, Room 2470.
Wed, Feb 1, 2017
7:30pm
IGO Opens a New Window onto the Universe - Seminar/Conference (190 Goodwin Hall)
On February 1, the Virginia Tech College of Science will launch its J. Mark Sower Distinguished Lecture Series, with debut speaker David Reitze, physicist and executive director of Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Project, commonly known as LIGO for short. Reitze and other scientists in the project in fall 2015 were able to detect for the first time gravitational waves in space. In his talk, Reitze will cover gravitational waves and what makes them so difficult to detect and at the same time represent such powerful and unique probes of the universe. This College of Science event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited.
Thu, Feb 23, 2017
7:30pm
Naomi J. Halas: Steam Generation - Seminar/Conference (190 Goodwin Hall, Quillen Auditorium)
The J. Mark Sower Distinguished Lecture Series in the College of Science at Virginia Tech continues with Naomi J. Halas, Stanley C. Moore Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy at Rice University. Halas will discuss 'Solar Steam Generation and Applications,' focusing on a class of nanoparticles can convert a broad spectrum of sunlight to instantly vaporize water and create steam. Halas is the second of five speakers for the 2017 run of speakers within within the J. Mark Sower Distinguished Lecture Series.
Thu, Mar 9, 2017
5:30pm
Unraveling the Multi-generational Syndrome of Diabetic Embryopathy: From Cell Signaling to Clinical Care - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Dean, School of Medicine; Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medicine, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Vice President, Medical Affairs; Bowers Distinguished Professor; University of Maryland An event in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Eric Shullman Distinguished Public Lecture Series More information on the event: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/events/2017/mar/09/e-albert-reece/ Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, Ph.D., Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Mar 16, 2017
5:30pm
Early Childhood Education: What Works and What Doesn't - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Greg J. Duncan, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor, University of California, Irvine An event in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Eric Shullman Distinguished Public Lecture Series and a lecture in the 2017 Brain School Greg J. Duncan, Ph.D., will conclude Brain School 2017 with a talk on early childhood education. At the beginning of kindergarten, children from low-income households are already a year behind high-income children in their math and reading achievement. These gaps change little over the course of their subsequent schooling. We summarize the available evidence on the extent to which expenditures on early childhood education programs constitute worthy social investments in the human capital of children. We consider evidence on both the best known programs as well as the much larger body of program evaluations published over the past 40 years and emerging evidence from recent state and local efforts. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, Ph.D., Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Apr 6, 2017
7:30pm
Cutchins Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Burruss Auditorium)
Douglas Brinkley, a professor of history at Rice University, bestselling author, and presidential historian for CNN, will give the Cutchins Distinguished Lecture at Virginia Tech. The event is free and open to the public. No tickets are required. If you are an individual with a disability and desire an accommodation, please contact Robin Atkins at 540-231-9457 or atkinsrw@vt.edu during regular business hours at least 10 days before the event. The Cutchins Distinguished Lecture is sponsored by the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets, the Maj. Gen. W. Thomas Rice Center for Leader Development, and the Pamplin College of Business. The lecture also is held in celebration of Founders Day.
Fri, Apr 7, 2017
3:00pm
G.V. Loganathan Distinguished Lecture - Academic (Hancock Auditorium)
Dr. David R. Maidment will be presenting a lecture titled "National Water Model of the United States." He is the Hussein M. Alharthy Centennial Chair in Civil Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin and is a specialist in surface water hydrology and in the development of water resource information systems.
Fri, Apr 7, 2017
4:00pm
Community Lecture: "Chasing Water in a Dynamically Changing World" - Seminar/Conference (The Lyric Theatre)
The Global Change Center Distinguished Lecture Series welcomes Brian Richter: Brian Richter has been a global leader in water science and conservation for more than 25 years. He is the Director of Global Freshwater Strategies for The Nature Conservancy, where he promotes sustainable water use and management with governments, corporations and local communities. He is also the President of Sustainable Waters, a global water education organization. Richter is the author of two books: "Chasing Water: A Guide for Moving from Scarcity to Sustainability" and "Rivers for Life: Managing Water for People and Nature" (co-authored with Sandra Postel). Brian Richter's lecture will be at the Lyric Theatre on Friday, April 7, 2017 at 4:00 pm. A book-signing event will follow the lecture.
Tue, Apr 18, 2017
5:00pm
PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Amartya Sen - Special Event (Haymarket Theatre)
Amartya Sen from Harvard University will give a talk on the topic (TBA). All faculty and students are welcome to attend.
Wed, Apr 19, 2017
4:45pm
2017 Steger Prize Awards Ceremony - Arts (Alumni Hall)
Please join distinguished professor Nikki Giovanni for the awarding of the Steger Prize, one of the most prestigious undergraduate prizes in poetry in the country. There will be a meet and greet starting at 4:45PM. The ceremony opens at 5:15PM with a poetry reading led by faculty members and Steger award finalists. A reception follows, featuring Nikki Giovanni's annual toast to poetry. Contact Patty Morse to RSVP.
Thu, Apr 20, 2017
7:00pm
Digging in the Crates #3: Gender & Hip Hop w/ Nikki Giovanni - Special Event (Newman Library Multipurpose Room (first floor))
Digging in the Crates, vol. 3: Gender & Hip Hop An evening with poet, activist, educator, & university distinguished professor Nikki Giovanni Hosted by Kimberly Williams (Assistant Director, Black Cultural Center) and Corey Miles (Ph.D student, Sociology/Africana Studies) 7pm: Corey & Kimberly interview Nikki Giovanni 7:40-8pm: Reading by Nikki Giovanni 8-9pm: Performances by VT's own Flowmigos Digging in the Crates: Hip Hop Studies at Virginia Tech is a monthly seminar series in the libraries that serves as a celebration of hip hop with both local and global foci. Each iteration will feature a presentation/panel/discussion, a workshop, and performances.
Thu, Apr 20, 2017
7:00pm
Digging in the Crates: Gender & Hip Hop ft. Nikki Giovanni - Diversity (Newman Library Multipurpose Room)
An evening with Poet, Activist, Educator, & University Distinguished Professor Nikki Giovanni. Digging in the Crates: Hip Hop Studies at Virginia Tech is a monthly seminar series that serves as a celebration of hip hop with both local and global foci. Each iteration will feature a 40 minute presentation/panel/discussion, a 40 minute workshop, and 40 minutes of performances.
Fri, Apr 21, 2017
11:15am
Distinguished Lecture Series: Department of Computer Science - Seminar/Conference (Torgersen Hall, room 2150)
Please join us for the culmination of our Distinguished Lecture series as we welcome alumnus Keith Sturgill, chief information officer at Eastman Chemical Company. He will discuss a vision of how the next great phase of technology advancement will impact the world and how young professionals entering the workforce can prepare to use their talents to make a real and lasting impact.
Fri, Apr 21, 2017
4:00pm
Chris Jackson - Imperial College - GSA Distinguished Lecturer - Seminar/Conference (4069 Derring)
- Host: Dr. Brian Romans
Tue, Apr 25, 2017
7:00pm
Family Caregiving: Health Effects, Treatments, and Policy - Special Event (Fralin Auditorium)
Please join us for the Center for Gerontology 21st Annual Recognition and Awards Celebration. Our keynote speaker this year will be Richard Schulz, Ph.D., Distinguished Service Professor of Psychiatry, Director of Gerontology, and Associate Director of the Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services, at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Schulz has focused on social-psychological aspects of aging, including the impact of disabling late life disease on patients and their families.
Tue, May 9, 2017
4:00pm
From Finding Nemo to Finding Patents: Natural history as inspiration for science and art - Special Event (Quillen Family Auditorium, Goodwin Hall)
Biomechanist Adam P. Summers is credited as the "fabulous fish guy" at the end of Pixar's "Finding Nemo." He was the scientific advisor for that film and its sequel, "Finding Dory," as well as the Keohane Distinguished Professor at the University of Washington. At this public lecture, Summers will share his insights on the intersection of science and art.
Thu, May 18, 2017
5:30pm
The Power of Integration in the Biomedical Sciences and Beyond: Using All Spheres of Knowledge to Solve Our Most Challenging Problems - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
David J. Skorton, M.D. Secretary of the Smithsonian; Distinguished Professor at Georgetown University An event in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Eric Shullman Distinguished Public Lecture Series. David J. Skorton, M.D. and secretary of the Smithsonian, will speak on the necessity of interdisciplinary problem-solving during a distinguished public lecture on May 18 at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. As the world becomes more connected and the problems we face become more complex, the solutions are increasingly more complicated as well. That is a concern of the biomedical sciences, whether considering the threat of emerging diseases, the burden of chronic disease, or health disparities, as well as the uncertainties related to the optimal use and ethical aspects of new technologies. But all other sectors of society must grapple with vexing challenges as well: environmental degradation, wage and wealth gaps, P-12 educational disparities, the cost and distribution of opportunity for higher education, and aging infrastructure. All of these will take more than science, math, and engineering to solve. We must also integrate the arts, humanities, and social sciences that provide creativity, wisdom, and unique insights into the human condition. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, Ph.D., Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Thu, Jun 8, 2017
5:30pm
A Neural Circuit Approach to Psychiatric Illness - VTC (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
Joshua A. Gordon, M.D., Ph.D. Director, National Institutes of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health An event in the distinguished-visiting-scholars-series/">Eric Shullman Distinguished Public Lecture Series. Technological innovations for observing and modulating activity within specific neural circuits in the brain continue to advance at a rapid pace. Careful planning is required to adapt these innovations to the study and treatment of psychiatric illness. Dr. Gordon will describe his research, which is focused on understanding altered processes in functional neural circuits underlying psychiatric symptoms, using animal models. He will also discuss how advancing these technological approaches may be relevant to human clinical psychiatric syndromes. Dr. Gordon's work provides an integrative neuroscience prospective on how psychiatric diseases should be considered, as researchers have found that many of the behavioral symptoms are linked to some form of neural circuit dysfunction. Ultimately, the aim of his research is not only understand the mechanisms of how the brain's neural circuits work but to use this understanding to develop novel treatments for individual patients with mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and depression. Live Webcast: http://research.vtc.vt.edu/live-webcast A public reception will be held in the VTC Cafe from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Hosted by: Michael J. Friedlander, Ph.D., Executive Director, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Sat, Sep 9, 2017
9:00am
Pregame Tech Talk featuring Dr. Matthew Gabriele - Special Event (Holtzman Alumni Center)
This is the first in a series of "Pregame Tech Talks," featuring distinguished VT faculty giving entertaining lectures on a variety of topics prior to home football games. Dr. Matthew Gabriele, Department of Religion and Culture, will deliver the lecture "Thinking about the Middle Ages with Game of Thrones." Dr. Gabriele will discuss why we think about the Middle Ages when we watch Game of Thrones and where those references come from.
Fri, Oct 6, 2017
8:00am
Finding Balance Conference - Special Event (The Inn at Virginia Tech )
The full-day conference is limited to 150 participants, and registration is required to confirm your spot. Registration opens for employees Sept. 1. This year there will be additional seating for the morning and afternoon keynote sessions, but registration is required to confirm your spot. Students are invited to attend from 1-5 p.m. More information may be found on GobblerConnect for students. New this year will be two morning breakout sessions that require registration. A cooking demonstration by one of The Inn's Banquet Chefs will feature the preparation of two items which will be served at lunch that day. Attendance is limited to 40 and registration is required. Search by alpha: Finding Balance 2017 Cooking Demonstration. The other session, Take Advantage of Your Hokie Perks: Cash Match and Premium Rewards, will offer employees the chance to learn about opportunities to "earn" money by making wise choices when it comes to health care and retirement. Registration is required so that a personalized printout of your current status may be provided to each employee that attends. Search by alpha: Take Advantage of Your Hokie Perks: Cash Match and Premium Rewards. Joining the conference this year will be Nikki Giovanni, University Distinguished Professor, who will speak after lunch from 1:15-2:15 p.m.
Fri, Oct 6, 2017
12:00pm
English Career Conference - Seminar/Conference (370/380 Shanks Hall)
At the ECC, members of the English Department's Distinguished Alumni Board meet with students and share how their background in English has led to successful careers in law, finance, education, information technology, aeronautics, conservation, non-profit organizations, professional writing, and entrepreneurship. Students and alumni participate in career search related activities including roundtable discussions, a professional luncheon, and a keynote by Carole Nickerson, Executive Assistant, Emerita, to the President, Virginia Tech. Her speech is entitled, "The Grammar of 'Leadership': Modifier Required." Students attend information sessions, led by career specialists, focusing on careers in creative writing, technical and professional writing, law, education, language and literature, finding internships, and applying to graduate school. Participants gain knowledge about preparing for careers following graduation, about job search strategies, and strategies that leaders use to succeed. They also attend a professional luncheon with tips on making a good impression in social situations. On Thursday evening, Becca Scott, Associate Director, Career and Professional Development, will kick off the event with a session entitled "You majored in what? How to market your English degree in any career field or industry." Registration closes September 26.
Fri, Oct 6, 2017
3:00pm
Clifford W. Randall Distinguished Lecture - Academic (Hyatt Place)
The climate is changing globally and across the U.S., with different types and extent of change in different regions. Observed changes include sustained deviation from long-term trends in atmospheric temperatures, water temperatures, precipitation amounts, drought duration, storm frequency, wind velocities, snow melt timing, flood frequency and characteristics, permafrost melting, and other phenomena. These changes are affecting civil and environmental infrastructure and leading to demand for infrastructure modification. The capacity for existing infrastructure to accommodate expected climate change is not well understood. Also not well understood are the types of alterations needed in current design guidelines and codes for new infrastructure to account for climate change impacts. Climate change adaptation for infrastructure is critical for civil and environmental engineering, and for sustainable communities, in the 21st Century. Climate change adaptation is an area of significant focus in the earth science and climate science academic communities. However, there has been limited engagement by engineers in climate change adaptation, mostly in relation to coastal issues. Much more engagement and leadership of civil and environmental engineers is needed across the broad spectrum of relevant infrastructure issues. Civil and environmental engineers need to be prepared to lead in answering questions about risks of and sustainable responses to climate change.
Tue, Oct 17, 2017
5:00pm
Happiness on Mexican Earth - Academic (West Ambler Johnston )
5:00pm Reception 5:30 Talk Dr. Paul Julian Smith, Distinguished Professor Graduate Center - CUNY Sponsored by: Dept of Foreign Languages & Lit, College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, El Centro, LGBTQ+ Resource Center, Residential College at West Ambler Johnston, Women's and Gender Studies
Fri, Nov 3, 2017
4:00pm
PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Martha Nussbaum - Special Event (McBryde 100)
Martha Nussbaum from the University of Chicago will give a talk on the topic "Anger and Revolutionary Justice." All faculty and students are invited to attend.
Thu, Feb 1, 2018
7:30pm
International Journey of Strings - Music/Theatre/Dance (Moss Arts Center)
Musica Viva presents a special concert, incorporating young musicians from Hong Kong, Australia, Vancouver and Beijing, with members of the Renaissance Music Academy Chamber Orchestra to form a large string orchestra which will perform a variety of music composed in America, China, Hong Kong, South America, and Europe. Jue Yao, a distinguished violinist from Hong Kong, who directs the Yao Jue Music Academy, and the Hong Kong String Orchestra, is visiting Blacksburg again, bringing several members of her HK String Orchestra. She will solo in one or two works. Qian Chen, a violinist from Beijing, formerly principal of the Central Conservatory Prep School in Beijing, who now resides in Vancouver, brings several young children with her as well. This concert embraces the music that unites all cultures, and is a wonderful celebration of the Chinese New year coming later in February
Thu, Feb 15, 2018
3:30pm
Lt. Gen. John F. Sattler Lecture - Corps (Burruss Auditorium)
The Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets welcomes Lt. Gen. John F. Sattler, U.S. Marine Corps (retired). In his last military assignment, Sattler was the director of strategic plans and policy for the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff. Today he is the Distinguished Chair of Leadership at the U.S. Naval Academy's Stockdale Center for Ethical Leadership.
Fri, Feb 16, 2018
4:00pm
Dr. Kirk Johnson, Director of Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History - Academic (The Lyric Theatre)
Dr. Kirk Johnson, a world-renowned paleontologist who focuses on fossil plants and the extinction of the dinosaurs, will visit Virginia Tech on Friday, February 16, 2018. He will give a 4:00 pm lecture, "NATURAL HISTORY IN THE AGE OF HUMANS", at the Lyric Theatre in downtown Blacksburg. The lecture is free and open to the public. A book signing will follow in the theatre's main lobby. This event is part of the annual Distinguished Lecture Series hosted by the Global Change Center with funding from Fralin Life Sciences Institute and the VT Graduate School.
Sat, Mar 3, 2018
5:00pm
Artist Talk: Ray Kass - Arts (Ruth C. Horton Gallery, Moss Arts Center, 190 Alumni Mall, Blacksburg, VA 24060)
Join us for an informal talk and brief Q&A with internationally renowned artist Ray Kass, a highly influential figure in contemporary art in Virginia and well beyond. His many accomplishments include establishing and directing the Mountain Lake Symposium and Workshop programs, which brought art world luminaries such as Clement Greenberg, Donald B. Kuspit, and John Cage to this area, as well as a distinguished career as a professor of art at Virginia Tech. Through his creative, academic, and collaborative works, Kass has influenced generations of artists in Virginia and the southeast.
Mon, Mar 19, 2018
5:30pm
Presentation by Farmer of the Year Robert Mills Jr. - Academic (Fralin Hall Auditorium and Atrium)
Owner of Briar View Farm in Callands, Virginia, Robert Mills Jr. (agricultural technology '94) will present a talk titled "On the Front Lines of Agriculture: What Role Will You Play?" Mills, who has distinguished himself as a driven, innovative, and diversified producer, is also a member of the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors. The presentation will be followed by a networking reception from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Fralin Hall Atrium.
Wed, Apr 18, 2018
5:00pm
PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Amartya Sen - Special Event (Haymarket Theatre)
Amartya Sen from Harvard University will give a talk on the topic: "Democracy and Elections". All faculty and students are invited to attend.
Fri, Sep 28, 2018
4:00pm
2018 Distinguished Marjorie Grene Speaker: Katherine Brading (Duke University) - Academic (Lavery 350)
Professor Katherine Brading's talk, "Emilie Du Chatelet and the Foundations of Physical Science", will be discussing various highlights of this text, and thereby argue for the importance of Du Chatelet in the history of philosophy of science.
Mon, Oct 29, 2018
7:00pm
9th Annual Department of Communication Distinguished Lecture - Special Event (Fife Theatre, Moss Arts Center)
Please join us to welcome Dr. Andrew Przybylski from the Oxford Online Institute as he speaks on Making Sense of Digital Screen Time and Children's Health in the Era of Open Science.
Sat, Nov 17, 2018
9:30am
Pregame HokieTalks - Academic (Holtzman Alumni Center 901 Prices Fork Road Blacksburg, VA 2406)
Join us during the football season for a Saturday morning lecture before the home game, featuring University Distinguished Professor Nikki Giovanni's talk "More Than Money: Less Than Sex." Where we will explore what poetry brings to life.
Mon, Nov 26, 2018
8:00pm
Music on Mondays, featuring David Korevaar, piano - Music/Theatre/Dance (Recital Salon, Squires)
Pianist David Korevaar balances his active performing schedule with teaching at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he is the Peter and Helen Weil Professor of Piano. He is a 2016 honoree as Distinguished Research Lecturer at the University of Colorado.
Fri, Jan 25, 2019
12:00pm
Thomas Gardner Research Talk - Academic (Room 005 (ground floor) of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Building 200 Stanger St.)
Lunch is provided Title: Sundays: Lyric Essays Abstract: I will be reading from the manuscript of a new book of prose poems or lyric essays, due out from Tupelo Press in 2019/2020. Building on my 2014 book Poverty Creek Journal, these 52 short meditations, written on consecutive Sundays from August 2017-August 2018, move out from particulars of the day (weather, landscape, friends and family) to the various shapes desire takes as it reaches toward the world and beyond it and then comes undone. What do we find in such spaces, these short pieces ask. How does the mind move there> What comes alive in brokenness? Along with reading selections from my book, I'll speak briefly about the connections between this creative project and a more formal academic book I'm completing examining the way such artists as Terrence Malikc, Annie Dillard, Czeslaw Milosz, and Marilynne Robinson use lyri modes of thinking to open up and explore a series of theological issues. Bio: Thomas Gardner is Alumni Distinguished Professor of English at Virginia Tech. He has published five books of literary criticism, the most recent being A Door Ajar: Contemporary Writers and Emily Dickinson (Oxford, 2006) and John in the Company of Poets: The Gospel in Literary Imagination (Baylor, 2011). His creative work includes two plays, Ear, and I, and Silence (2004) and Eurydice (2006); a book of poems, The Mime, Speaking (1992); and most recently a collection of lyric essays or spiritual improvisations entitled Poverty Creek Journal. The entries in this year-long running journal, mostly focused on morning runs in the nearby Jefferson National Forest, reflect on the boday, poetry, theology, family and grief. He has held Guggenheim, Fulbright, and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships.
Wed, Feb 20, 2019
5:00pm
PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Dan Ariely - "Free Beer" - Academic (Moss Arts Center)
James B. Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics, Duke University. Public reception after the lecture. Co-organized with the Data and Decisions Destination Area at Virginia Tech ("Free Beer" is only the lecture title. No free beer provided.)
Mon, Mar 18, 2019
Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire - College of Architecture and Urban Studies (Cowgill Hall Lobby, 2nd Floor)
Henry H. Wiss Center for Theory and History of Art and Architecture presents the exhibition: Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire: "A Way of Life" The exhibit plays tribute to distinguished architect Lois D. Gottlieb, long-time friend of the School of Architecture + Design, and former member of the board of directors of the International Archive of Women in Architecture, who died last August 12, 2018, at age 91. Also, on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, the film "Building a Dream," produced by Lois D. Gottlieb, will be shown at 2pm in the Art + Architecture Library.
Tue, Mar 19, 2019
Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire - College of Architecture and Urban Studies (Cowgill Hall Lobby, 2nd Floor)
Henry H. Wiss Center for Theory and History of Art and Architecture presents the exhibition: Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire: "A Way of Life" The exhibit plays tribute to distinguished architect Lois D. Gottlieb, long-time friend of the School of Architecture + Design, and former member of the board of directors of the International Archive of Women in Architecture, who died last August 12, 2018, at age 91. Also, on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, the film "Building a Dream," produced by Lois D. Gottlieb, will be shown at 2pm in the Art + Architecture Library.
Wed, Mar 20, 2019
Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire - College of Architecture and Urban Studies (Cowgill Hall Lobby, 2nd Floor)
Henry H. Wiss Center for Theory and History of Art and Architecture presents the exhibition: Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire: "A Way of Life" The exhibit plays tribute to distinguished architect Lois D. Gottlieb, long-time friend of the School of Architecture + Design, and former member of the board of directors of the International Archive of Women in Architecture, who died last August 12, 2018, at age 91. Also, on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, the film "Building a Dream," produced by Lois D. Gottlieb, will be shown at 2pm in the Art + Architecture Library.
Thu, Mar 21, 2019
Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire - College of Architecture and Urban Studies (Cowgill Hall Lobby, 2nd Floor)
Henry H. Wiss Center for Theory and History of Art and Architecture presents the exhibition: Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire: "A Way of Life" The exhibit plays tribute to distinguished architect Lois D. Gottlieb, long-time friend of the School of Architecture + Design, and former member of the board of directors of the International Archive of Women in Architecture, who died last August 12, 2018, at age 91. Also, on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, the film "Building a Dream," produced by Lois D. Gottlieb, will be shown at 2pm in the Art + Architecture Library.
Fri, Mar 22, 2019
Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire - College of Architecture and Urban Studies (Cowgill Hall Lobby, 2nd Floor)
Henry H. Wiss Center for Theory and History of Art and Architecture presents the exhibition: Lois D. Gottlieb, Architect Extraordinaire: "A Way of Life" The exhibit plays tribute to distinguished architect Lois D. Gottlieb, long-time friend of the School of Architecture + Design, and former member of the board of directors of the International Archive of Women in Architecture, who died last August 12, 2018, at age 91. Also, on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, the film "Building a Dream," produced by Lois D. Gottlieb, will be shown at 2pm in the Art + Architecture Library.
Mon, Apr 1, 2019
7:30pm
Terry Tempest Williams, author, environmentalist, and activist - Arts (Moss Arts Center, 190 Alumni Mall, Blacksburg, VA 24061)
Terry Tempest Williams has been called "a citizen writer," a writer who speaks and speaks out eloquently on behalf of an ethical stance toward life. A naturalist and fierce advocate for freedom of speech, she has consistently shown us how environmental issues are social issues that ultimately become matters of justice. Known for her impassioned and lyrical prose, Williams is the author of environmental literature classic "Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place," "Finding Beauty in a Broken World," and "When Women Were Birds," among others. Her most recent book, "The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks," honors the centennial of the National Park Service and is a New York Times best seller. Among many awards, she is the recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in creative nonfiction. In 2014, on the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, she received the Sierra Club's John Muir Award honoring a distinguished record of leadership in American conservation. Williams also received the 2017 Audubon New York Award for Environmental Writing. Presented in partnership with the Department of English $25 general admission $10 students with ID and youth 18 and under, 20%-30% subscription discounts available
Mon, Apr 1, 2019
7:30pm
Reading by Author Terry Tempest Williams - Special Event (Moss Arts Center)
Terry Tempest Williams has been called "a citizen writer," a writer who speaks and speaks out eloquently on behalf of an ethical stance toward life. A naturalist and fierce advocate for freedom of speech, she has consistently shown us how environmental issues are social issues that ultimately become matters of justice. Known for her impassioned and lyrical prose, Williams is the author of environmental literature classic "Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place," "Finding Beauty in a Broken World," and "When Women Were Birds," among others. Her most recent book, "The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks," honors the centennial of the National Park Service and is a New York Times best seller. Among many awards, she is the recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in creative nonfiction. In 2014, on the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, she received the Sierra Club's John Muir Award honoring a distinguished record of leadership in American conservation. Williams also received the 2017 Audubon New York Award for Environmental Writing. Information can be found on tumblr: vtcwmfa.tumblr.com
Tue, Apr 9, 2019
5:00pm
2019 Steger Prize Awards Ceremony - Special Event (Anne and Ellen Fife Theatre, Moss Arts Center)
Please join distinguished professor Nikki Giovanni for the awarding of the Steger Prize, one of the most prestigious undergraduate prizes in poetry in the country. There will be a meet and greet starting at 5:00 pm. The ceremony opens at 5:15 pm with a poetry reading led by faculty members and Steger award finalists. A reception follows, featuring Nikki Giovanni's annual toast to poetry.
Sat, Apr 13, 2019
7:30pm
Naturally Sharp's Spring Concert: Saturday Natty Live - Music/Theatre/Dance (Graduate Life Center Auditorium)
Naturally Sharp presents their Spring 2019 Concert: Saturday Natty Live! Naturally Sharp is an all-male a cappella group at Virginia Tech distinguished by their clean maroon blazer look. You'll hear songs by artists such as The Weeknd, Michael Jackson, Zac Brown Band, Panic! At The Disco, and many more. Come out and listen to us wild and crazy guys sing our hearts out to new arrangements, share some laughs, and a whole lot more cowbell. Tickets are $5 at the door or you can be put on our will call list by contacting one of the group's members.
Thu, Aug 29, 2019
6:00pm
Distinguished Artist Lecture: Daniel Canogar - Arts (Moss Arts Center )
This is a singular opportunity to hear internationally acclaimed, Madrid-based artist Daniel Canogar speak about the processes behind his groundbreaking works, including his site-specific, data-based sculptural installation, Surge (2019), the Moss Arts Center's new Grand Lobby wall commission.
Tue, Oct 1, 2019
7:00am
NVTC Capital Cybersecurity Summit - Greater Washington DC Metro Area (The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner 1700 Tysons Blvd. McLean, VA)
Join the region's most innovative cybersecurity companies and influential thought leaders at the fourth annual Capital Cybersecurity Summit on October 1, 2019 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner. The summit will feature unique insights from distinguished keynote speakers and panels, a technology showcase of the region's top cybersecurity companies, and exceptional networking with local and national cybersecurity experts and solution providers. The Capital Cybersecurity Summit and Capital Cyber Awards will provide tremendous business development and educational value for NVTC members and the entire regional technology community. Virginia Tech is an Academic Partner of NVTC, and a panel session sponsor for the Capital Cybersecurity Summit.
Fri, Oct 18, 2019
4:00pm
10th Annual Department of Communication Distinguished Lecture: Online Experiences of Marginalized Individuals. - Seminar/Conference (Fife Theater, Moss Arts Center)
When it first permeated homes, the Internet was touted as the great liberator. Today, it is clear that the Internet is neither a utopia nor an equitable agora. Social media have, however, provided millions of individuals unprecedented access to communicating with others through both private and public platforms. Novel and fulfilling ways of self-expression have emerged. People who are socially isolated or otherwise unsatisfied with their offline lives have developed meaningful social connections online. Although there have been innumerable benefits, there have also been considerable downsides, particularly for marginalized individuals. Stereotyping, discrimination, and harassment persist, and in some cases are exacerbated, through social media. Speaker Jesse Fox, Ph.D. School of Communication The Ohio State University
Fri, Oct 25, 2019
3:00pm
English Career Conference - Seminar/Conference (Shanks and Owens Halls)
Student registration is now open for the 12th Annual Career Connections hosted by the Distinguished Alumni Board, Oct 24 & 25, 2019 in Owens and Shanks Halls. As part of the day you will have the opportunity to attend 3 Career Panels. Dress is business casual. A jacket and tie for men are not required; a shirt and a tie or polo and khakis are appropriate.
Thu, Nov 14, 2019
3:30pm
Medal of Honor Recipient Staff Sergeant Melvin Morris Speaks - Corps (Burruss Hall Auditorium)
The Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets welcomes Medal of Honor recipient Staff Sergeant Melvin Morris. His talk with cadets is open to the public. Morris distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving as commander of a strike force drawn from Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, during combat operations in Chi Lang, Republic of Vietnam on Sept. 17, 1969. Public seating is available behind the cadets, who have assigned seating in the front half of the auditorium. This event is part of the Cutchins Leadership Lecture Series is part of the cadet Corps Lab curriculum, housed in the Pamplin College of Business.
Thu, Nov 14, 2019
3:30pm
Medal of Honor Recipient Staff Sergeant Melvin Morris Speaks - Corps (Burruss Auditorium)
Staff Sergeant Melvin Morris distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Commander of a Strike Force drawn from Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, during combat operations against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Chi Lang, Republic of Vietnam on September 17, 1969. Ample seating is available behind the cadets, who have assigned seating in the front half of the auditorium. This event is part of the Cutchins Leadership Lecture Series is part of the cadet Corps Lab curriculum, housed in the Pamplin College of Business.
Thu, Feb 6, 2020
4:00pm
CANCELED: PPE Reading Group - Academic (Major Williams Hall, room 225)
-THIS EVENT IS CANCELED- The PPE Reading Group meets every other Thursday during the semester to read and discuss Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo's book, "Good Economics for Hard Times" (2019). Together with Michael Kremer, Banerjee and Duflo won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2019 for their work on global poverty alleviation. On April 1, 2020, Professor Duflo will deliver the 2020 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Complimentary books, pizza, and drinks will be provided to the PPE Reading Group. For more information and to join the group - you do not have to be affiliated with PPE to join - please contact Gil Hersch.
Thu, Feb 20, 2020
4:00pm
CANCELED: PPE Reading Group - Academic (Major Williams Hall, room 225)
-THIS EVENT IS CANCELED- The PPE Reading Group meets every other Thursday during the semester to read and discuss Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo's book, "Good Economics for Hard Times" (2019). Together with Michael Kremer, Banerjee and Duflo won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2019 for their work on global poverty alleviation. On April 1, 2020, Professor Duflo will deliver the 2020 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Complimentary books, pizza, and drinks will be provided to the PPE Reading Group. For more information and to join the group - you do not have to be affiliated with PPE to join - please contact Gil Hersch.
Thu, Mar 5, 2020
4:00pm
CANCELED: PPE Reading Group - Academic (Major Williams Hall, room 225)
-THIS EVENT IS CANCELED- The PPE Reading Group meets every other Thursday during the semester to read and discuss Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo's book, "Good Economics for Hard Times" (2019). Together with Michael Kremer, Banerjee and Duflo won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2019 for their work on global poverty alleviation. On April 1, 2020, Professor Duflo will deliver the 2020 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Complimentary books, pizza, and drinks will be provided to the PPE Reading Group. For more information and to join the group - you do not have to be affiliated with PPE to join - please contact Gil Hersch.
Thu, Mar 19, 2020
4:00pm
CANCELED: PPE Reading Group - Academic (Major Williams Hall, room 225)
-THIS EVENT IS CANCELED- The PPE Reading Group meets every other Thursday during the semester to read and discuss Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo's book, "Good Economics for Hard Times" (2019). Together with Michael Kremer, Banerjee and Duflo won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2019 for their work on global poverty alleviation. On April 1, 2020, Professor Duflo will deliver the 2020 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Complimentary books, pizza, and drinks will be provided to the PPE Reading Group. For more information and to join the group - you do not have to be affiliated with PPE to join - please contact Gil Hersch.
Wed, Apr 1, 2020
5:00pm
POSTPONED: PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Esther Duflo - Academic (Moss Arts Center)
-THIS EVENT WILL BE POSTPONED- Esther Duflo, Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics at MIT and recent co-winner of the Nobel Prize, will give a lecture on her new book "Good Economics For Hard Times." The lecture will be followed by a public reception and book signing. The event is free with no tickets required. All faculty, students, and member of the public are invited to attend.
Thu, Apr 2, 2020
4:00pm
CANCELED: PPE Reading Group - Academic (Major Williams Hall, room 225)
-THIS EVENT IS CANCELED- The PPE Reading Group meets every other Thursday during the semester to read and discuss Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo's book, "Good Economics for Hard Times" (2019). Together with Michael Kremer, Banerjee and Duflo won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2019 for their work on global poverty alleviation. On April 1, 2020, Professor Duflo will deliver the 2020 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Complimentary books, pizza, and drinks will be provided to the PPE Reading Group. For more information and to join the group - you do not have to be affiliated with PPE to join - please contact Gil Hersch.
Thu, Apr 16, 2020
4:00pm
CANCELED: PPE Reading Group - Academic (Major Williams Hall, room 225)
-THIS EVENT IS CANCELED- The PPE Reading Group meets every other Thursday during the semester to read and discuss Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo's book, "Good Economics for Hard Times" (2019). Together with Michael Kremer, Banerjee and Duflo won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2019 for their work on global poverty alleviation. On April 1, 2020, Professor Duflo will deliver the 2020 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Complimentary books, pizza, and drinks will be provided to the PPE Reading Group. For more information and to join the group - you do not have to be affiliated with PPE to join - please contact Gil Hersch.
Tue, Feb 2, 2021
2:30pm
PPE Reading Group: Crashed - A Decade of Financial Crises - Academic (Virtual )
This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Adam Tooze's book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World (2018). The book offers an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis and its ten-year aftermath as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today. Professor Tooze is an award-winning economic historian. He will deliver the 2021 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture in April this year. The PPE Reading Group takes place via Zoom and is scheduled for every other Tuesday, 2:30-4:00pm. To join the group and receive Zoom meeting details, please contact Gil Hersch (hersch@vt.edu).
Tue, Feb 16, 2021
2:30pm
PPE Reading Group: Crashed - A Decade of Financial Crises - Academic (Virtual )
This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Adam Tooze's book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World (2018). The book offers an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis and its ten-year aftermath as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today. Professor Tooze is an award-winning economic historian. He will deliver the 2021 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture in April this year. The PPE Reading Group takes place via Zoom and is scheduled for every other Tuesday, 2:30-4:00pm. To join the group and receive Zoom meeting details, please contact Gil Hersch (hersch@vt.edu).
Tue, Mar 2, 2021
2:30pm
PPE Reading Group: Crashed - A Decade of Financial Crises - Academic (Virtual )
This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Adam Tooze's book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World (2018). The book offers an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis and its ten-year aftermath as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today. Professor Tooze is an award-winning economic historian. He will deliver the 2021 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture in April this year. The PPE Reading Group takes place via Zoom and is scheduled for every other Tuesday, 2:30-4:00pm. To join the group and receive Zoom meeting details, please contact Gil Hersch (hersch@vt.edu).
Tue, Mar 16, 2021
2:30pm
PPE Reading Group: Crashed - A Decade of Financial Crises - Academic (Virtual )
This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Adam Tooze's book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World (2018). The book offers an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis and its ten-year aftermath as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today. Professor Tooze is an award-winning economic historian. He will deliver the 2021 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture in April this year. The PPE Reading Group takes place via Zoom and is scheduled for every other Tuesday, 2:30-4:00pm. To join the group and receive Zoom meeting details, please contact Gil Hersch (hersch@vt.edu).
Tue, Mar 23, 2021
5:00pm
Nikki Giovanni Celebration of Poetry - Special Event (Virtual)
Each spring, the Virginia Tech Department of English hosts a festive tribute to Giovanni-Steger Poetry Prize winners - and poetry itself - through the Nikki Giovanni Celebration of Poetry. Nikki Giovanni, the University Distinguished Professor of English, established he poetry competition for Virginia Tech undergraduates and named if for its first benefactor, Charles W. Steger, the university's president at the time. This year, the event will be virtual. It will be live broadcast from the Moss Arts Center. The ceremony will recognize the ten finalist before culminating in the naming of the top three winners. The Giovanni-Steger Poetry Prize is one of the most prestigious undergraduate literary prizes in the country. The contest is open to all undergraduates regardless of major. The top prize the most generous for undergraduate poetry in the Western Hemisphere. The annual award is supported by a generous donation form Donna and Dennis Treacy '78. To view the ceremony, visit: https://youtu.be/jT2iCMQK1kk.
Mon, Mar 29, 2021
2:00pm
Jennifer Sano-Franchini: Designing Outrage, Programming Discord: A Critical Interface Analysis of Facebook as a Campaign Technology - Research (Webinar)
Conversations around U.S. electoral politics have centered in large part on a social networking site once designed to bring college students together. Facebook has become a source from which a significant number of voters and potential voters, at least in the U.S. context, receive news and information about candidates and political issues. Dr. Sano-Franchini's presentation examines the user experience design of Facebook as a political campaign technology through a critical interface analysis of facebook's user interface, focusing on four key microinteractions: browsing, commenting, reacting, and posting. In brief, Sano-Franchini argues that Facebook's user interface creates spaciotemporal realities that prioritize concision, speed, curation practices that llimit divergent perspectives, and the flattening of complex identities and political commitments such as they are indexable, processable, and thus, monitizable. Further, they consider how these mediated spaciotemporal realities re-shape the emotional and affective orientations through which users interact with digital content, with one another, and with the political system more generally. Dr. Jennifer Sano-Franchini is an Associate Professor of English and Director of Professional and Technical Writing. Her research and teaching interests are in the cultural politics of design, Asian American rhetoric, UX, and the rhetorical work of institutions. She has published on a range of topics including the politics of Facebook's interface design, Asian American sonic rhetorics, and emotional labor on the academic job search. Her works also appeared in the edited collections Rhetoric and Experience Architecture, and Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities, which won the 2016 Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award. The Virginia Tech Center for Humanities presents a series of talks by faculty research associates who will discuss their work. This talk is free and open to the public and we invite anyone to attend. There will be a brief Q and A session following the presentation. If you are an individual with a disability and desire an accommodation, please contact the Center for Humanities at 540.231.1981 or email humanities@vt.edu at least 10 business days prior to the event.
Tue, Mar 30, 2021
2:30pm
PPE Reading Group: Crashed - A Decade of Financial Crises - Academic (Virtual )
This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Adam Tooze's book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World (2018). The book offers an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis and its ten-year aftermath as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today. Professor Tooze is an award-winning economic historian. He will deliver the 2021 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture in April this year. The PPE Reading Group takes place via Zoom and is scheduled for every other Tuesday, 2:30-4:00pm. To join the group and receive Zoom meeting details, please contact Gil Hersch (hersch@vt.edu).
Tue, Apr 13, 2021
2:30pm
PPE Reading Group: Crashed - A Decade of Financial Crises - Academic (Virtual )
This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Adam Tooze's book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World (2018). The book offers an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis and its ten-year aftermath as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today. Professor Tooze is an award-winning economic historian. He will deliver the 2021 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture in April this year. The PPE Reading Group takes place via Zoom and is scheduled for every other Tuesday, 2:30-4:00pm. To join the group and receive Zoom meeting details, please contact Gil Hersch (hersch@vt.edu).
Wed, Apr 21, 2021
5:00pm
PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Adam Tooze - Academic (Virtual )
Adam Tooze, Shelby Cullom Davis Chair of History and Director of the European Institute at Columbia University, will deliver the 2021 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture. Professor Tooze is author of Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Change the World (2018). In 2019, Foreign Policy Magazine named him one of the top Global Thinkers of the decade. At Virginia Tech, Professor Tooze will speak about the "Shutdown: How COVID Shook the World Economy." All faculty, students, and members of the public are welcome to attend this lecture. However, advance registration is required under this link: https://virginiatech.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_sfTB6Ro0TMCiIcGGdxqTxw
Thu, Sep 30, 2021
7:30pm
"Duets" with Dianne Reeves, Chucho Valdes, and Joe Lovano - Arts (Moss Arts Center)
Savor a rare evening of piano duets with three masters of jazz. Winner of six Grammy and three Latin Grammy Awards, the Cuban pianist, composer, and arranger Chucho Valdes is the most influential figure in modern Afro-Cuban jazz. Five-time Grammy Award winner Dianne Reeves is the pre-eminent jazz vocalist in the world today-her arsenal of talents is richly on display in each and every song of her limitless repertoire. Hailed by the New York Times as "one of the greatest musicians in jazz history," Grammy Award-winning saxophone titan Joe Lovano has distinguished himself as a prescient and pathfinding force in the arena of creative music. Don't miss the magic when these legends come together on the Fife stage! Presented in partnership with the Black Cultural Center
Thu, Oct 7, 2021
11:30am
How Europe (mis)Understands Black America - Academic (Virtual)
JMEUCE Distinguished Lecture featuring Gary Younge, Professor of Sociology, University of Manchester, with comments by Dr. Felix Germain, Department of Africana Studies, University of Pittsburgh Europe's views on Black America are informed by a range of contradictory tendencies: amnesia about its own colonial past, ambivalence about its racial present, a tradition of anti-racism and international solidarity and an often fraught geo-political relationship with the United States itself.
Thu, Oct 28, 2021
6:00pm
US-EU Member States' approaches to COVID-19 - Academic (Virtual)
Faculty, students, and the broader Blacksburg community are invited to join us for the Erasmus speaker series. Dr. Nikos Zahariadis (Mertie Buckman Distinguished Professor of International Studies, Rhodes College) will discuss US-EU Member States' approaches to COVID-19 (tentative topic). Link to follow.
Thu, Nov 4, 2021
7:00pm
Freedom Revolutions: A Live Reading, Conversation, and Book-Signing with Reception - Special Event (Fife Theater, Moss Arts Center)
Alumni Distinguished Professor Lucinda Roy and MFA student Bessie Flores Zaldivar will read from their fiction and discuss issues of race and social justice they explore in THE FREEDOM RACE, the first book in Lucinda Roy's speculative slave narrative trilogy, and RAIN REVOLUTIONS, Bessie Flores Zaldivar's new fiction chapbook. The event will also be livestreamed, and a book-signing and reception will follow. This event is free and open to the public. Sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing and the Department of English. With grateful thanks to the Moss Arts Center and the University Bookstore. For more information, contact lroy@vt.edu & bessieflores@vt.edu.
Mon, Feb 7, 2022
7:00pm
Virginia Tech Humanities Week: Guest Lecture by Trudier Harris - Special Event (McBryde Hall Room 129)
University of Alabama Distinguished Research Professor Trudier Harris will draw on literature, science, culture, rhetoric, and film across time and languages in her guest lecture as part of Virginia Tech Humanities Week. Presentation titled "Ever-Elusive Literacy: It Hugs Us, Then Runs, Hides, and Jumps Out to Shock Us."Register to attend in-person.
Wed, Feb 16, 2022
5:00pm
PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Nobel Prize Winner Esther Duflo - Academic (Virtual)
Recent co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, Esther Duflo, will deliver the 2022 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab. Professor Duflo is the youngest person and second woman to win the Nobel Prize in Economics. At Virginia Tech, Professor Duflo will speak about her (co-authored) book, Good Economics for Hard Times, which addresses some of the thorniest social and political problems of our time. All faculty, students, and members of the public are welcome to attend this lecture. Advance registration is required for this virtual event. Please visit the following link to register for this event: https://virginiatech.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_H67ogfIcSEqerYfkVOKYlQ
Tue, Feb 22, 2022
12:15pm
Plantation Histories and the University: Rethinking the Past During Virginia Tech's 150th - Seminar/Conference (Zoom: tinyurl.com/2p8zkb4d)
Virginia Tech's Blacksburg campus occupies land that was once worked by dozens of enslaved people. The oldest building on campus, Solitude, is a former plantation home. Smithfield, another plantation owned by members of the same slaveholding family, sits adjacent to campus and now operates as a museum. As Virginia Tech commemorates its 150th anniversary, join our distinguished panel of speakers to discuss the intertwined histories of Solitude, Smithfield, and VT--and how those histories are being reimagined during the sesquicentennial. The panel features Victoria Ferguson (Director/Docent for the Solitude-Fraction Site); Kerri Moseley-Hobbs (Executive Director of the More Than A Fraction Foundation and Fraction family descendant); Ryan Spencer (Executive Director, William Preston's Smithfield); and Daniel B. Thorp (Associate Professor of History at VT and author of "In the True Blue's Wake: Slavery and Freedom among the Families of Smithfield Plantation"). Sponsored by the Virginia Tech History Department's Diversity and Inclusion Committee, with support from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. Register here: tinyurl.com/2p8zkb4d
Tue, Dec 13, 2022
12:00pm
Pamplin Sesquicentennial Virtual Celebration - Special Event (Virtual)
The virtual program will include Interim Dean Robin Russell, distinguished alumni leaders, students, and faculty.
Wed, Mar 15, 2023
5:00pm
PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Kwame Anthony Appiah - Academic (Anne and Ellen Fife Theatre (Moss Arts Center))
Award-winning philosopher, cultural theorist, and novelist Kwame Anthony Appiah will deliver the 2023 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Kwame Anthony Appiah is Professor of Philosophy and Law at New York University. He has published widely in literary and cultural studies, with a focus on African and African-American culture. Among many other honors, Professor Appiah won the Ralph J. Bunche Award of the American Political Association "for the best scholarly work in political science which explores the phenomenon of ethnic and cultural pluralism," the Outstanding Book Prize of the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights, and the Arthur Ross Book Award of the Council on Foreign Relations. At Virginia Tech, drawing from his work on cosmopolitanism and identity, Professor Appiah will first explore the idea of identity philosophically, then focus on the psychology of identity and the challenges of managing identities in a humane way. He will examine how partisan identity works in our own society today, and end by discussing the role of identities across the world, defending the continuing relevance of a cosmopolitan respect for the diversity of identities, an attitude that is very much under attack. His lecture is titled, "Politics and Polarization: The Place of Identities in Democracy." All faculty, students, and members of the public are welcome to attend this lecture. The event is free with no tickets required. The lecture will be followed by a public reception.



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